World's oldest people

Discussion in 'The Human Condition' started by Anonymous, Dec 5, 2002.

  1. Ermintruder

    Ermintruder Existential pixelfixer

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    That Parr case is fascinating, I do like the evidence of him having been called to court at a specific date (ie it is not a birth or marriage record).

    The cause of death 'plethora following late-life over-plenty' is somewhat circumstantial. But persuasive. I wonder if this longevity case might be true?

    EDIT "Jenkins" not Parr
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  2. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...

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    Are you referring to Jenkins rather than Parr?
     
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  3. Ermintruder

    Ermintruder Existential pixelfixer

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    Dammit, yes! Co-citation cross-contamination. Thank goodness it wasn't case law!!
     
  4. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...

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    Sorry to have nurtured confusion ... I included the Jenkins bit in my quoted text because it was the expository lead-in to the Parr-specific passages.

    ... And then got confused myself when I wasn't sure whether your 'called to court' referred to Jenkins giving evidence or Parr being summoned by the king.

    ... So I guess we're even ... :evil:
     
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  5. Ermintruder

    Ermintruder Existential pixelfixer

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    [thread-drift] Á propos 'court'.....I've often wondered, when we 'court disaster', or are 'called to court' (regal, legal, or even, presumably, ecclesiastical)....

    Are these phonetic instances of ''court'' related to the word court as in 'court shoes' (i.e. short-heeled?) And is that just a homophone for 'curt', as in someone being 'short' (idiomatically, nasty, or less of a person) in their treatment of someone else? Or are they somehow all directly convergent/derivative? [/thread-drift]
     
  6. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

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    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
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  7. Tribble

    Tribble Furry Idiot

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    The world's oldest person has died in Italy at the age of 117, reports say.

    Emma Morano was born on 29 November 1899 in the Piedmont region of Italy. She was officially the last person born in the 1800s still living.

    She had attributed her longevity to her genetics and a diet of three eggs a day, two of them raw.

    Ms Morano was the oldest of eight siblings, all of whom she has outlived. She died at her home in the northern city of Verbania.

    Her life not only spanned three centuries but also survived an abusive marriage, the loss of her only son, two World Wars and more than 90 Italian governments.


    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-39610937
     
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  8. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    The Indonesian man who claimed to be 146 years old - the longest living human ever - has died in his village in Central Java.

    According to his papers, Sodimedjo, also known as Mbah Ghoto (grandpa Ghoto), was born in December 1870.

    But Indonesia only started recording births in 1900 - and there have been mistakes before.

    Yet officials told the BBC his papers were valid, based on documents he provided and interviews with him.

    He was taken to hospital on 12 April because of deteriorating health. Six days later he insisted on checking out to return home.

    "Since he came back from the hospital, he only ate spoonfuls of porridge and drank very little," his grandson Suyanto told the BBC.

    "It only lasted a couple of days. From that moment on to his death, he refused to eat and drink."

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-39768321?ocid=socialflow_twitter
     

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