Uncontacted Tribes Of The Amazon

Discussion in 'General Forteana' started by the_walkin_dude, May 30, 2008.

What do we do?

  1. Contact them to explain the outside world and then allow them to make up their minds

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
  2. Intervene and try to modernize their lifestyles

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Do everything possible to keep them isolated

    7 vote(s)
    87.5%
  1. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  2. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  3. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    The massacre that never was.

     
  4. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  5. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Full text, images and vid at link.

     
  6. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    And the latest explorer to investigate an Amazon tribe is David Beckham! (Yes, that one!)

    David Beckham Into the Unknown

    After 22 years playing for the world's greatest football teams, David Beckham has retired. To mark the occasion he's going on an adventure in Brazil.

    For the first time in his adult life he has freedom to do whatever he wants and to mark the occasion he's going on an adventure. He's chosen Brazil, and he's taking three of his closest friends to join him on this once in a lifetime experience. Starting with beach footvolley in Rio, the friends travel deep into the Amazon, ending up with the remote Yanonami tribe, with David desperately trying to explain the beautiful game.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... he-unknown

    Duration: 90 minutes. Days left: 6

    The BBC calls the tribe the Yanonami. (But on this thread alone you'll also find Yanomani and Yanomami!) Reaching the tribe is shown at 01h 15m in.

    Beckham comes across very well, IMHO - he's relaxed and interested. Definitely a people person. The children were fascinated by his tattoos!
     
  7. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  8. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Video: A journey to the territory of isolated tribes in the Amazon

    Villagers along the Curanja River in Peru report sightings and even raids by isolated tribespeople who typically live a traditional life deep in the Amazon rainforest. Why are these isolated people emerging now, and can contact between worlds be managed without suffering?Science’s Andrew Lawler went to find out.



    http://news.sciencemag.org/2015/06/video-journey-territory-isolated-tribes-amazon
     
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  9. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Feature: Is Brazil prepared for a 'decade of contacts' with emerging tribes?

    BRASÍLIA—In a spacious, art-filled apartment in Brasília, 75-year-old Sydney Possuelo takes a seat near a large portrait of his younger self. On the canvas, Possuelo stares with calm assurance from the stern of an Amazon riverboat, every bit the famous sertanista, or Amazon frontiersman, that he once was. But on this late February morning, that confidence is nowhere to be seen. Possuelo, now sporting a beard neatly trimmed for city life, seethes with anger over the dangers now threatening the Amazon's isolated tribespeople. “These are the last few groups of humans who are really free,” he says. “But we will kill them.”

    For decades, Possuelo worked for Brazil's National Indian Foundation (FUNAI), the federal agency responsible for the country's indigenous peoples. In the 1970s and 1980s, he and other sertanistas made contact with isolated tribespeople so they could be moved off their land and into settlements. But Possuelo and others grew alarmed by the human toll. The newly contacted had no immunity to diseases carried by outsiders, and the flu virus, he recalls, “was like a suicide bomber,” stealing into a village unnoticed. Among some groups, 50% to 90% died (see sidebar). In 1987, Possuelo and fellow sertanistas met to try to stop this devastation. ...

    http://news.sciencemag.org/latin-am...azil-prepared-decade-contacts-emerging-tribes
     
  10. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    A visitor brings doom to an isolated tribe

    COLUMBIANA, PERU—One day in the early 1950s, when he was a young child living with his family in the Amazon rainforest, Marcelino Pinedo Cecilio encountered his first outsiders. At the sight of light-skinned people who wore clothes, “my mother grabbed me and we ran into the forest,” recalls the 69-year-old.

    Not long after, a man whom Cecilio remembers as a German anthropologist visited their isolated village on the upper Curanja River in this remote corner of the Amazon. (Anthropologists say the visitor may have been ethnographer and photographer Harald Schultz, who worked for what later became FUNAI, the Brazilian governmental agency that protects indigenous people.) “We were naked,” Cecilio says. “He came with machetes, mosquito nets, axes, and clothes.”

    The visitor stayed 1 night before heading upriver, then returned a couple of weeks later, leaving behind a necklace of fish bones as a gift. Soon after, villagers developed a sore throat and burning fever. Cecilio estimates that 200 people died and the tribe scattered. “We were so weak, and some vanished into the forest.” The tribe blamed the necklace, thinking it was poisoned. ...

    http://news.sciencemag.org/latin-america/2015/06/visitor-brings-doom-isolated-tribe
     
  11. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    How Europeans brought sickness to the New World

    In the Americas, the arrival of Europeans brought disease, war, and slavery to many indigenous peoples. Can some of the world’s last isolated groups avoid those fates as they make contact in the 21st century?

    When the Taino gathered on the shores of San Salvador Island to welcome a small party of foreign sailors on 12 October 1492, they had little idea what lay in store. They laid down their weapons willingly and brought the foreign sailors—Christopher Columbus and his crewmen—tokens of friendship: parrots, bits of cotton thread, and other presents. Columbus later wrote that the Taino “remained so much our friends that it was a marvel.”

    A year later, Columbus built his first town on the nearby island of Hispaniola, where the Taino numbered at least 60,000 and possibly as many as 8 million, according to some estimates. But by 1548, the Taino population there had plummeted to less than 500. Lacking immunity to Old World pathogens carried by the Spanish, Hispaniola’s indigenous inhabitants fell victim to terrible plagues of smallpox, influenza, and other viruses. ...

    http://news.sciencemag.org/2015/06/how-europeans-brought-sickness-new-world
     
  12. Yithian

    Yithian Intergalactic Space Crusader Staff Member

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    Not untouched tribes, but a fascinating look at how one Amazon tribe views fragments of the wider world.
    (Turn on captions for the translation)

     
  13. Elsupremo

    Elsupremo Ephemeral Spectre

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    The tribesmen are really saying, "These fools have lost their G-Damn minds "

    IMG_0448.JPG
     
  14. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Members of isolated tribe killed. Possible massacre.

    They were members of an uncontacted tribe gathering eggs along the river in a remote part of the Amazon. Then, it appears, they ran into gold miners.

    Now, federal prosecutors in Brazil have opened an investigation into the reported massacre of about 10 members of the tribe, the latest evidence that threats to endangered indigenous groups are on the rise in the country.

    The Brazilian agency on indigenous affairs, Funai, said it had lodged a complaint with the prosecutor’s office in the state of Amazonas after the gold miners went to a bar in a town near the border with Colombia and bragged about the killings. They brandished a hand-carved paddle they said had come from the tribe, the agency said.

    “It was crude bar talk,” said Leila Silvia Burger Sotto-Maior, Funai’s coordinator for uncontacted and recently contacted tribes. “They even bragged about cutting up the bodies and throwing them in the river.” ...

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...mbered-gold-miners-brazil-funai-a7940081.html
     
  15. chicorea

    chicorea Devoted Cultist

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    The systematic killing of the last tribes Amazon dates from some decades now. I heard or read many of this histories. And once the gold diggers arrived to the brazilian Congress (the first of them was the infamous Major Curio, still in the 1990s) they have everything to act covered by the authorities. I'm sure that what we call "the last tribes" are aware of the menace and are going even further inside the jungle. But so are the gold diggers, the coffee farmers, the FARC, the Blackwater operatives and even the antropologists. They have few chances to keep hiding.
     
  16. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    A lone survivor, still alive.

    Remarkable footage has been released of an uncontacted indigenous man who has lived alone in an Amazon forest for at least 22 years.

    Semi-naked and swinging an axe vigorously as he fells a tree, the man, believed to be in his 50s, has never been filmed so clearly before and appears to be in excellent condition.

    “He is very well, hunting, maintaining some plantations of papaya, corn,” said Altair Algayer, a regional co-ordinator for the Brazilian government indigenous agency Funai in the Amazon state of Rondônia, who was with a team who filmed the footage from a distance. “He has good health and a good physical shape doing all those exercises.”

    Known as the “indigenous man in the hole”, he is believed to be the only survivor of an isolated tribe. He hunts forest pigs, birds and monkeys with a bow and arrow and traps prey in hidden holes filled with sharpened staves of wood. He and his group were known for building holes and his hammock is strung over one in his house.

    Loggers, farmers and land grabbers murdered and expelled indigenous populations in the area in the 1970s and 1980s, and this man is believed to be the only survivor of a group of six killed during an attack by farmers in 1995. He was first located in 1996 and has been monitored by Funai ever since. A glimpse of his face filmed in 1998 was shown in Brazilian documentary Corumbiara.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/off...le-survivor-of-amazon-tribe-emerges-1.3571168
     
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  17. Min Bannister

    Min Bannister Justified & Ancient

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    How sad. Poor man. :(
     
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  18. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

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    I don't know . . . :thought:
     
  19. Min Bannister

    Min Bannister Justified & Ancient

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    I am not sure what you mean?
     
  20. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

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    Well his face was last posted twenty years ago and he's had more proposals than anyone on Facebook.

    I made the last half of that sentence up. :axem:

    The fate of his people is truly sad, admittedly.
     

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