Timeslip at Waterloo Station?

Discussion in 'It Happened to Me!' started by AsamiYamazaki, Sep 13, 2004.

  1. Dr_Baltar

    Dr_Baltar Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    1,900
    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    79
    LOCATION:
    Bohemian Groove
    That's certainly true. However, what's of relevance here is how long coin collectors have been using those small plastic wallets. I don't know for sure but suspect this is an innovation that doesn't date back that far. Vintage coin collecting albums I've seen are pages made of thick board with holes cut for the coins top be placed in. In the alleged case of Mr Squirrel, the more pertinent question would not have been when the company stopped manufacturing these envelopes, but rather when they started.
     
    NumberNine likes this.
  2. NumberNine

    NumberNine Junior Acolyte

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    19
    That's a good point. A quick browse of a couple of coin collecting forums would suggest that paper envelopes were used for coins until Mylar/BoPET was invented in the mid-1950's. According to this guy;

    "...it was in the late '30s when the popularity exploded. And at that time paper envelopes and coin folders were about all there were for coin storage. I cannot give you an exact date range, but I believe it was in the late '50s that coin flips were invented, might have been the early '60s though. Probably around the same time 2x2s came along. I can tell you that well into the '70s coin folders/albums and paper envelopes were far and away the most popular storage methods. And as time and technology went on plastic, and its benefits began to make its inroads. The US Mint issued its first hard plastic coin holders in 1968. And that was really the beginning of modern coin holders.
    (Cited from: https://www.cointalk.com/threads/discussion-of-old-storage-supplies.208549/)

    Edited to add from the same forum;

    "In a 1945 issue they are selling 2X2 paper envelopes, one seller has some with a cellophane window, but apparently just on one side. A 1949 issue is also mostly 2X2 paper envelopes. There is one seller of a 2X2 holder which is a card you put the coin in which then slides into a 2X2 outer holder with acetate windows. I've flipped through bound volumes of the 1957 and 58 issues and found nothing, but most of the ads were removed from those before binding. I'll have to wait until I have a chance to go through my unbound copies. Maybe check as see what I can find in the old back issues of The Numismatist as well. Oh and that two piece holder I mentioned with the acetate windows. They were called Hollander holders and the windows were tradenamed "Kodapak". That may be what longnine was thinking of." (Cited from: https://www.cointalk.com/threads/discussion-of-old-storage-supplies.208549/page-2)

    This guy might be worth asking;

    "David Lange of NGC has quite a collection of the coin boards from the 30's & 40's. I believe he wrote a book about them." (Cited from: https://www.cointalk.com/threads/discussion-of-old-storage-supplies.208549/page-2)
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
    JamesWhitehead likes this.
  3. Carl Grove

    Carl Grove Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    44
    Worth noting what Joan Forman says about this issue:

    "Like many amateur numismatists, he [Mr Squirrel] uses small plastic envelopes in which to keep individual coins, and his local village shop is not always able to supply these.... he went to a certain shop he had heard of [in Great Yarmouth] which sold this type of goods. The place was a general stationers, and old-established..." [Forman emphasizes that the witness had never been there before.]

    Maybe in 1973 UK coin collectors were more likely to use plastic coin envelopes than US (which I suspect the quote comes from).

    The shop assistant told Squirrel that the plastic envelopes she sold him were used by fishermen to keep hooks in.
     
    NumberNine and Rosebud like this.
  4. Dr_Baltar

    Dr_Baltar Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    1,900
    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    79
    LOCATION:
    Bohemian Groove
    We aren't concerned with what coin collectors used in 1973 are we, but rather what they used in Edwardian times? I'd hazard they didn't use plastic envelopes, either in the UK or the US. Nor would I expect fishermen of that time to use them.
     
  5. MorningAngel

    MorningAngel Abominable Snowman

    Messages:
    664
    Likes Received:
    755
    Trophy Points:
    94
    Where did you get your account of Mr S? All the ones I’ve read said he went to buy envelopes, not that they were coin envelopes.
     
  6. Carl Grove

    Carl Grove Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    44
    If the slip was to ca 1920 they might well have had plastic envelopes. The remark about fishermen does seem odd, but that is what the witness said the assistant said. To be precise, "He remarked on the number [of envelopes] and the assistant replied, 'We sell a lot of these to men on the sailing-ships to put fish-hooks in.'"
     
    NumberNine likes this.
  7. Carl Grove

    Carl Grove Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    44
    The original source is:
    Joan Forman, The Mask of Time, McDonald and Jane, 1978. Mine is the Corgi edition of 1981, pp.54-9.
     
  8. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

    Messages:
    27,143
    Likes Received:
    11,418
    Trophy Points:
    284
    LOCATION:
    Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
    What about waxed paper? It looks a bit like plastic and has been around for donkey's years.
     
  9. NumberNine

    NumberNine Junior Acolyte

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    19
    Interesting detail that. So despite the fact that he purchased them for the purpose of storing coins, the date plastic filps became available for coin collectors could be irrelevant if the envelopes she sold him were intended for a different purpose.
     
    Rosebud likes this.

Share This Page