Time Dilation / Time 'Slowing Down'

Discussion in 'It Happened To Me!' started by poozler, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    Thanks for that Carl, and that's an angle I'd totally overlooked. Perhaps one day, when my £10 Million Pound research grant comes through... ;)

    Seriously, I'd love to dedicate some real time to working on this.

    Thanks again, appreciate the reply.

    Regards

    James
     
  2. Carl Grove

    Carl Grove Abominable Snowman

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    It's great to hear someone really interested in looking into time-related phenomena. You don't need millions really, with the internet you don't even have to send out questionnaires by post, a lot of useful work could be done on the cheap! I didn't get actively involved until I lost my main job and had time on my hands -- and the most expensive thing I've actually had to pay for was a search at the local record office.
     
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  3. XBergMann

    XBergMann Fear not, I mean no harm to your planet

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    Here is our Nige expanding on the topic, I might add that this is not the interview I remember but a different one although Nige still claims to be able to control time, maybe he is a Time Lord (cue dramatic music)

     
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  4. Vardoger

    Vardoger Bring the Beat Back!!

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    A normal human can probably separate a second into 50 frames. If someone is able to separate a second into 100 frames it may look like they're slowing time down from their point of view. Is is probably necessary for professional drivers and pilots etc. to develop this ability.
     
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  5. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    XBergMann, thanks for that, much appreciated. I'll give it a view when I have access to YouTube next.

    I've just started reading "The Labyrinth of Time" by Anthony Peake (https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00995FS22/), and although I'm finding it a bit hard-going, there's a fascinating paragraph on the whole tortoise and the hare race, and which I'd like to quote here;

    /q

    Zeno's second paradox is officially known as the 'argument of Achilles' although most readers will recognize it as the story of the race between the tortoise and the hare. In modern times it has also been called the 'bisection paradox'. This asserts that in any race the slower runner can never be overtaken by a faster one who is pursuing.

    In the popular tortoise-and-hare version there is a 100 metre race. As the hare is a much faster runner than the tortoise,it is agreed that the tortoise will be given a 50-metre start. So it is only when the tortoise passes the halfway stage that the hare is allowed to shoot off in pursuit. The hare then runs 50 metres and arrives at the point that the tortoise had reached when the hare first started to race.

    In the time it has taken the hare to run that 50 metres the tortoise has strolled another metre.

    In order to catch up with its opponent the hare has to run the additional metre. However, as it takes an amount of time for the hare to cover this additional metre, the tortoise will have already moved nearer the finishing line.

    In this model the hare can never catch the tortoise. It is continually arriving at a point in space and time that the tortoise has already moved on from.


    /endquote

    Regards

    James
     
  6. Nick Smith

    Nick Smith Junior Acolyte

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    I agree with others about time seeming to slow in a crisis.

    I was involved in a serious RTA on the M25 some years ago which saw my VW Passat written off in a head on smash at 60mph.

    A motorcycle undercut a car in front of mine in lane three causing her to slam on the anchors.

    Although I was some distance behind her I was helpless and saw her car looming larger and larger and, something that took about 2 seconds went on for ages.

    I was able to think, right, I'm going to hit this car hard and the airbag will deploy, I had time to slide back on my seat to avoid a broken nose, lift my non braking foot to lessen the chance of breaking both legs and throw the car to the right and the central reservation and crash barriers rather than spinning into the inside lanes and certain death under a HGV.

    I remember it so clearly.
     
  7. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    Thanks for this, Nick.

    Out of interest, how do you interpret what happened with regard to the time slow-down?

    Regards

    James
     
  8. Nick Smith

    Nick Smith Junior Acolyte

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    I imagine that this is a mechanism which is inherent in all of us where, with death or serious injury imminent, our primal instincts are triggered in an attempt to preserve life.

    In our evolution weve have had to contend with lightning fast predators and other humans, trying to kill us and our last line of defence is an ability to focus our entire being into one make or break moment.

    I personally think that time is, in some regards, subjectively "fluid" by which I mean that, on an individual basis, we can briefly, step outside of normal time to act in a crisis. I have absolutely no way of proving that feeling though.

    There are countless tales of, for example, soldiers or police officers who claim that...in a crisis, they are able to perform an act of self preservation or the saving of a colleague in a timeframe which defies logic.

    I have also heard of soldiers who claim to have " seen" a projectile, bullet or shrapnel, flying towards them but their bodies are too slow to take evasive action in time to avoid injury.

    I was able to react in time because I was young with young reflexes.

    These days I'd have ended up seriously damaged I fear.
     
  9. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    That's another interesting thought you've raised... I wonder what the ratio of these experiences is when the age of the person reporting it is taken into account?

    If it were possible to graph say, 1000 people who've had a like experience by their age at the time they had the experience, would you see a sharp declining trend as the age increases? Do adolescents / children ever experience it (notwithstanding the whole childhood feeling that minutes / hours / days seem to take forever to pass) in the sense that they recognise it as something different and not the norm.?

    Opens up even more questions... would older people feel less inclined to report it and so on and so on...

    Regards

    JKW
     
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  10. Vardoger

    Vardoger Bring the Beat Back!!

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    The older you get, the faster the time seems to go. Not sure if it has anything to do with the fact that one year is one tenth(1/10) of a ten year old child's life, while it is one fiftieth(1/50) of a 50 year old person's life.
     
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  11. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ... Staff Member

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    This subjective effect seems to be universal. I don't know any fellow survivors of a half-century or more who don't mention, or at least acknowledge, it.

    I ascribe it to the vagaries of learning and memory. The first time one encounters X, it takes substantial effort to deal with it. Fifty years later one has encountered so many 'things-like-X' that the surprise and effort have diminished, and encounters with X elicit considerably more humdrum / routine responses based on experience.

    Phrased more simply ... The first time you wrestle with X is a big deal. The 100th time you have to deal with X it's just 'more of the known / same'. Big deals get written large in memory, whereas the same ol' same ol' hardly registers a blip.
     
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  12. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ... Staff Member

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    Agreed ... Having experienced it all too many times, I can attest to the notion it's built-in.


    It's not necessary to frame things in term of an external time progression from which a crisis actor diverges. It's just as viable (and, IMHO, far more accurate ... ) to approach the evidence in terms of the subjective 'mind flow' speeding up.

    The sense of time passing involves mapping a progression of events and actions onto an abstract scalar dimension (i.e., the 'arrow of time').

    There are two basic ways to experience moving from (e.g.) 0 to 10 on time's yardstick at a non-standard or anomalous increased rate.

    One is for the yardstick to be influenced to slide past you faster than normal. The other is for you to speed up and 'see' or 'experience' the movement in increments of sixteenths of an inch rather than the usual whole inches.

    Either approach accounts for the perceived anomaly. The latter doesn't involve reliance upon an external standard.
     
  13. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ... Staff Member

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    I've experienced both, and the subjective sense of time dilation is the same in both instances (i.e., whether it involves action or resignation). My canonical personal example of the latter case was watching an arrow fly directly at my left eye from a distance of only circa 20 feet away.


    The subjective time dilation effect still occurs at an advanced age, but the ability to rapidly react is naturally diminished with age. The former is a cognitive / psychological issue, and the latter is a somatic issue.
     
  14. bobandterry

    bobandterry Junior Acolyte

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    Been meaning to put two events of time dialation for a while.

    1) Cycling in Bristol near to White Tree Roundabout on the downs. If you know the area on the Westbury side there is a small junction. A car pulled out in front of me. I managed a Starsky and Hutch roll over the bonnet. From my persepctive it happened in slow motion.

    2). For my sins I like a game of golf. I played a Captains Away Day at Bedale a couple of years back. A woodland course with very close fairways, I cannot remember the exact hole where the time dialation occured.

    It happened like this. I heard someone shout fore and my playing partner shouted. I turned to my right and spotted a ball flying fast in my direction. At this point time slowed down. I focused on the ball as it moved into range. Without exaggerated movement I casually moved my head back. The ball flew passed my face, I even watched the ball glide by. Just after that point, time glitched back into normal speed. Most bizarre.
     
  15. SkepticalX

    SkepticalX Devoted Cultist

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    Patient: "If I take up golf, will I live longer?"
    Doctor: "No, but it's sure going to seem a lot longer."
     
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  16. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    Was it like 'bullet time' as in The Matrix?
     
  17. henry

    henry still speeding

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    precisely what i was thinking ... what year was this ?

    (although bullet time precedes the matrix cf. michel gondrys smirnoff adventure magnum opus)
     
  18. bobandterry

    bobandterry Junior Acolyte

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    It had a certain similarity. I have to admit I have never seen any of the Matrix's, only clips.
     
  19. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    Thanks for sharing that Bobandterry, interesting read.

    To me, it's two more examples of the "potentially bad / dangerous situation triggering a quickening of the brain functions"-type thing; I must come up with a long-winded and pompous term for that... ;)

    I still think my own take on these is just that; you become aware of a threat, and your mind / consciousness / whatever "speeds up" to allow you to cope with the situation. I believe they are totally separate from time "dilation" or "slips" where the observer appears to travel back or forward in time, or experiences a repeat of an event.

    Thanks again for posting.

    Regards

    James
     
  20. AlchoPwn

    AlchoPwn Abominable Snowman

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  21. blessmycottonsocks

    blessmycottonsocks Justified & Ancient

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    Bumping my recollection of being in a RTA:

    "... when a 7.5 tonner slammed into the back of my stationary car on the M3 some 12 years ago, I remember there being a strange strobing effect, as if the impact and subsequent spinning of my car occurred as a series of flickering images."
     
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  22. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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  23. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    Thanks and fascinating. Another variant...

    Regards
     
  24. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ... Staff Member

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    A clarification ...

    Time dilation refers to the 'now' timeframe seeming to be stretched out or extended so that its progress is subjectively perceived as slower than normal. This is the subjective flip-side of having one's conscious processing 'speed up' as you described. As such, it isn't a 'separate' phenomenon at all.

    Time 'slips' refer to shifting into a timeframe other than the presumptively objective 'now'. This is indeed 'separate' from the subjective time dilation effect discussed here.
     
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  25. cycleboy2

    cycleboy2 Abominable Snowman

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    I have one experience which seems to fall into the area of time dilation. When I was 18, I was out with friends for a very late night though with very little drinking involved, and in the early hours - about 3am - I fell down a manhole, in Hollywood silent-movie style. It was barely any wider than me, and could have been horrific if I hadn't gone 'neatly' through (had I caught my arm I reckon that could have been very nasty), though I still fell about 12ft onto a stone floor in a vault under the pavement. But I remember as I fell thinking this is going to hurt when I hit the bottom, a journey that seemed to take for ever, but which took 0.9 seconds (according to Angio.net's 'splat calculator') with an energy of 2548 joules at the bottom.

    The fall seemed to stretch out for seconds, though not long enough for me to do anything; the flipside is that I was still pretty relaxed when I hit the floor and suffered no serious injuries, a few bumps and bruises on my left-hand side and a torn vintage blazer (oh yes!). My father blames the shock of the incident on me developing an allergy to aspirin which manifested itself by nearly killing me a few weeks later.

    It was an interesting night all things considered. Early in the evening I got a long, deep cut along the side of one of toes, cutting it on broken glass while skinny-dipping across the river with friends; I still have the scar. As for the manhole, a coach had mounted the pavement and broke it. No barriers were put up, just a piece of wood placed on the pavement that I'd actually moved as I thought it presented a trip hazard! Is that a definition of irony?
     
  26. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    Thanks for that.

    I can't remember where, but I read a horror novel story once about a guy who found himself kidnapped, removed of his senses of sight and hearing by way of plugs / mask etc., and "strapped to something"; the story went along the lines of him working out by touch he was on a bed, but was suspended "above" something.

    The narrative implied to me that at the moment he eventually plunged off / "fell off" the bed, and without really knowing how far he would be falling, was the moment he lost his sanity, even though (from memory) it was only a few feet off the ground. The "fall" in his mind became "timeless"... a concept I've seen in other stories too. I think this one was a Clive Barker short...

    I remember a second story too from long agai about the discovery of teleportation and how it only seemed to partially work with living creatures; inanimate objects were fine, but if you pushed a mouse through the sending portal, it arrived dying or dead at the receiving portal. However, it was discovered by chance that it was only the "head" part that was the "problem"... if you pushed a horse, mouse or any animal in "backwards", it was fine (you could "see" the animal emerging in real time at the destination portal), until it reached the head, and where at the other end it was "dead within a few moments".

    Eventually, the government (?) allows an experiment with a live person, a condemned criminal if I recall, so that the scientists can try and actually ask him what was "happening" to kill everything;

    So he goes through, and when he comes out he's all wide-eyed and clearly gone stark-raving mad... just before he expires, he says that the time he was actually "transferring" wasn't instantaneous, but instead was the equivalent of 100's of years of "nothingness", lived out second by second like a purgatory of sorts... which let's face it, is enough to kill anyone.

    If anyone is interested, post here and I'll try and locate the actual authors and stories of these two snippets (and another one which was an episode of "Star Trek: the Next Generation" where Picard undergoes sensory deprivation leading to a stretching of time experience that suddenly comes to mind too).

    Oh, reason I was actually posting; in the new FT number 369, August 2018, there's another letter on this thread's subject called "Time Dilation", p74, and is worth a read.

    The gang also printed a letter i'd written too on the previous page p73 titled "A load of hot air", if anyone remember's Mat Coward's "useless buttons" article from a while back.

    Regards
     
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  27. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    This was / is most 99.9999% likely "Dread", a Clive Barker short from his "Books of Blood" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Books_of_Blood volume 2

    Regards
     
  28. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    Sounds like Stephen King's The Jaunt. Not exactly the same but the time dilation aspect is similar. One of my favourite of his stories.
     
  29. jkwatsonft

    jkwatsonft Fanning the flames

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    Thanks Escargot.

    Yes, that's the one! Great detective work there. Fits in with my reading horror phase from a while back. Funny too how the story is warped by the time in one's own memory, but that's a topic with it's own threads in itself, I'm sure. ;)

    More here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jaunt but beware of plot spoilers.

    Thanks again,

    Regards

    James
     
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  30. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    Glad to be of service! :hoff:

    Memory - yup, it's a strange thing. When I think of that story it reminds me of the old swimming baths in my home town. I have no idea why - there's something about it that brings to mind the tiles on the floors and walls. As if I'm walking along the poolside again, as when I was about 11.
     

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