Thylacines (Post-1936 Sightings)

Discussion in 'Cryptozoology: Mystery Quadrupeds' started by songhrati, Mar 9, 2007.

  1. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    No, you are a dreamer. It's the dreamers in this world that makes things happen. Never stop dreaming.
     
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  2. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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  3. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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  4. krissy97

    krissy97 Junior Acolyte

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    I always like to read about recently reported sightings, even if it could be mistaken identity(no stripes unless of course they just couldn't see them). I just wish they would stop calling it "The Beast". I think the papers need a new catch phrase, come up with something more real because it was no beast. They are just making it sound scary to sell papers.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2016
  5. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    I agree Krissy. But if not "The beast" what would you suggest? Tatsy? Nope. But something less threatening. The confusing thing is it is called "a Tiger", because of stripes or then again "Wolf" because it looks so much like one. Have you thought of an alternate name for "the beast"? Do native peoples have an alternate name for it?
     
  6. Mungoman

    Mungoman Mostly harmless...

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    The mainland people from South Australia [Adnyamathanha mob - Flinders Ranges] called him Marrukurli.

    The Tasmanian name for him is Coorinna.

    Other uncited names are Loarinna, Laoonanna, and Lagunta.


    https://books.google.com.au/books?i...OnDTQQ6AEIPjAI#v=onepage&q=marrukurli&f=false
     
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  7. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

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    Sounds like the hipster family you least want at the next table! :)
     
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  8. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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    I don't trust Paddle as a source for this word referring to a thylacine. I really like a lot of Paddle's work but back in that book he made a lot of truly glaring errors. And although in many ways it's a great piece of reference material, I'm really not satisfied with pages 22-23 at all.

    The entire 21/3/1840 article dealing with Lichfield's 13/9/1839 lecture at the Adelaide Literary Association and Mechanic's Institute which Paddle hangs his S.A relict population theory on, is coming out soon on the 'Trove'. I've seen a little bit more than is reproduced in the book (on the TAGA FB page of all places) and the entire inference seems to hang on a few ambiguous words following directly on from a description of the tiger in Tasmania.

    I seriously doubt that Paddle had the right interpretation in 2000. Obviously though, that's strictly from the perspective of his being right about there being European corroboration of a possible relict population in the Flinders Range. Aboriginal sources if they exist elsewhere have to be considered equally, or in my opinion more seriously, in their own right. But as, so far as I'm aware, Paddle is the only one attributing the name Marrukurli to the tiger it must be suspect, until or unless some further indigenous sources are, or have been, found.

    The answers to this would seem to lie in Dorothy Turnbridge's 'The Story of the Flinders Range Mammals (1991). But I've got no chance of accessing that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2016
  9. krissy97

    krissy97 Junior Acolyte

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    How about they just call it "The Thylacine" seems catchy enough and most people will know what you are talking about, no tiger, wolf or hyena needed to suggest something it is not. It could be the new catch phrase.
     
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  10. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    I think that might be the answer as those other monikers appear too tough to pronounce or even remember.
     
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  11. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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    Personally I think the thylacine and the Tasmanian tiger, or just tiger, is fine. These are words that have always been used for the animal. Other variants now seem to have gone into disuse like 'zebra wolf', 'possum hyena' and 'native hyena'.
     
  12. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    As a youngster it really bugged me that ny animal could go extinct and thus no loner be seen or be a part of life. Seeing a short news reel that showed a Thalacine doing a yawn really made an impression on me, Like a dog with a rally huge mouth,t hat impression on a ten year old has stayed with me all these years' (I'm pushing 80.)
     
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  13. Mungoman

    Mungoman Mostly harmless...

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    Knowing the Australian penchant for frigging about with words - in this case, it wouldn't surprise me to soon hear it called the Thylo...as in Johnno...and Davo...and Jimbo.
     
  14. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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  15. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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  16. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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    I missed that, so an extra glittering accolade to you. To be honest, I had no idea how big they were till I looked it up after you said.
     
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  17. lordmongrove

    lordmongrove Justified & Ancient

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    I hate the term Tasmanian tiger and will always say Thylacine or Tasmanian wolf.
     
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  18. lordmongrove

    lordmongrove Justified & Ancient

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    How about the Yucatan and the Aztec pyramids?
     
  19. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    I never got as far as the Mexican pyramids. I grant you they would be interesting. I guess I just have a gringo fear of Mexico. Call it preconditioning.
     
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  20. VinceWLB

    VinceWLB Junior Acolyte

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    I always use the term Thylacine because:

    1/ The species isn't endemic to Tasmania.
    2/ They have little to do with Tigers, even i feel Wolf is a bit far fetched. It's an unique animal in so many ways.
     
  21. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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    I'm happy enough with calling it a tiger, it's got a long tradition of being called that and if I only called it a thylacine, I'd be writing thylacine, thylacine, thylacine too much in a paragraph. It annoys me to repeat the same word too often when I'm writing, so I use tiger to break it up.

    I don't like wolf though, that's got connotations that you're reducing it down to being just a convergent species, when it was/is much more unique than that.

    What was it some wanker called it, 'a kangaroo masquerading as a wolf'.
     
  22. amyasleigh

    amyasleigh Abominable Snowman

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    The business of "what name(s) for our favourite stripy marsupial carnivore?" -- I'm on the same page in various ways, with a number of PPs. Am like lordmongrove in that I prefer -- gut-wise anyway -- "Tasmanian wolf" to ditto "tiger": in my case, just because "Tasmanian wolf" was the name under which I first learnt of the species -- as a kid in the 1950s, from books in the family from a generation or two or three previously. Becoming aware much later, of the more generally popular in its homeland, "tiger" appellation, my initial thought was, "that's silly -- except for the stripes, it's nothing like a tiger: re placental-animal-resemblances, it's less cat-like, than dog-like".

    I feel with oldrover that I want to have available some alternative name to use, so that when writing or talking about the animal, I'm not repeating "thylacine" the whole time, stuck-record-wise. Am ready enough these days to use "tiger" for that purpose; it seeming to be more employed for the creature, than anything else which isn't the "three-syllable word starting with t and finishing with e" -- though "wolf" strikes a more agreeable chord with me.

    Agree "with my head" with krissy97, that the animal was basically, just itself -- really not much like a wolf, tiger, or hyena -- none of them in any way, zoologically-good parallels.
     
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  23. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    It looks like a weird dog or wolf. Other than stripes it looks nothing like a tiger. People tend to call strange beasts and even humans (Indians for American natives) by whatever name comes to mind when they first encounter the creatures. I would not be adversed to renaming the animal by its original native moniker. But Tasmanian wolf or tiger has become so entrenched, it would be difficult to rename it. American Indians are still "Indians" to most Americans, Remember the Brontosaurus? They tried to change that one to Apatasaurus. A few of the very young went along with the change' but most people over 30 still knew it as a Brontosaurus. Then they discovered more bones that re-establisjed the Brontosaurus and , again, we have a generation confused' but a lot of happy older dinosaur collectors.
     
  24. lordmongrove

    lordmongrove Justified & Ancient

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    It turns out that Brontosaurus was a real species after all and distinct from Apatasaurus.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brontosaurus
     
  25. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    Yes, I know. Beautiful....what? B y any other name the Tasmanian wolf, tiger. whatever, will still be a fascinating animal worthy of our respect and possible return. And yes there are large tracts where it can be reestablished; if it isn't already there.
     
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  26. krissy97

    krissy97 Junior Acolyte

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    I found an interesting article on DNA I thought you might like, it does talk about the Thylacine and the Devil at the end of it. If DNA research can save a species from extinction like the Devil then it is worth the time and money put into the effort.

    http://phys.org/news/2010-01-mammoth-forefront-molecular-biology.html

    The scientists are still of course obsessed with cloning a woolly mammoth, I think it is just because they find them frozen and think they are a good source of DNA. If that obsession leads to breakthroughs in science that helps surviving species then more power to them.
     
  27. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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  28. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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    It's been kindly pointed out to me that information I gave earlier in this thread is wrong. I said that there was only one known example of thylacine material from New Guinea. This is way out.

    In addition to pointing out my error they were also kind enough to send more information which I'll link to here for those who are interested.
    openresearch-repository.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/9440

    Relevant chapters being 7-10.
     
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  29. oldrover

    oldrover Justified & Ancient

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  30. Brig

    Brig Abominable Snowman

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    A really good photo. I never saw that one before.
     
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