The Secret World of Tibet

Discussion in 'Earth Mysteries: Historical & Classical Cases' started by Yithian, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. Yithian

    Yithian Incredulous Staff Member

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    WEBSITE:
    http://petergreenaway.org.uk/drowning.htm
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/page/item/b0093677.shtml

    I want to watch this as i've been told it's excellent viewing, but i'm outside the Uk!

    Can someone please help me find a way to work-around. (Uk-based proxies?)

    The rest of you UK-bound people can enjoy it and whet my appeitite with comments.
     
  2. lupinwick

    lupinwick Justified & Ancient

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    LOCATION:
    Somewhere near the priory
    Could be a naughty way, but how about a torrent? Somebody may well have created one (without the iPlayer DRM).
     
  3. bazizmaduno

    bazizmaduno Ephemeral Spectre

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  4. Yithian

    Yithian Incredulous Staff Member

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    WEBSITE:
    http://petergreenaway.org.uk/drowning.htm
    Thank you very much. :)
     
  5. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Some more Tibetan secrets.

     
  6. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Its a fake!

     
  7. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    For more than two decades, University of Virginia Tibet Center archaeologist and historian John Vincent Bellezza has been exploring highland central Asia, going places where few archaeologists and explorers have ventured. Since 1992, he has investigated and documented scores of monumental sites, rock art, castles, temples, residential structures, and other features on the desolate reaches of the Tibetan Plateau, building a knowledge base on a vast archaic civilization and ancient religion that flourished long before Buddhism emerged and dominated this otherwise comparatively sparsely populated high altitude region.

    “Commonly, when people think of Tibet, Buddhism comes to mind,” writes Bellezza in his newest book, The Dawn of Tibet. By this he also implies the better-known and popular images of the imposing, sky-high, mountaintop monumental wonders of Buddhist centers such as Lhasa. But, he continues, “before Buddhism was introduced, a different type of civilization reigned in Tibet, one with monuments, art, and ideas alien to those of more recent times……….Demarcated through an enormous network of citadels and burial centers spanning one thousand miles from east to west, it would endure for some fifteen hundred years.”*

    Bellezza is describing an archaic civilization known as Zhang Zhung, which flourished from about 500 BC to 625 AD and encompassed most of the western and northwestern regions of the Tibetan Plateau. Mastering an ancient technology base not normally attributed to peoples of this region in the popular perception, the people of Iron Age Zhang Zhung, according to Bellezza, built citadels, elite stone-corbelled residential structures, temples, necropolises featuring stone pillars, sported metal armaments and a strong equestrian culture, established links with other cultures across Eurasia, and exhibited a relatively uniform and standardized cultural tradition rich in ritualistic religious practice, where kings and priests dominated the highest rungs of power. These are all characteristics of stratified, centralized and developed societies most often associated with the more southerly, lower-altitude great Old World Bronze and Iron Age civilizations that ringed the Mediterranean as well as the advanced civilizations of Mesoamerica and South America. The supporting findings on the landscape, when considered across two decades of investigation, have been nothing less than prolific.

    http://popular-archaeology.com/issu...lores-the-first-civilization-of-ancient-tibet
     
  8. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Another Tibetan secret uncovered.

    Archaeologists in "Tibet autonomous region"* believe the ninth century Purang stele to be the oldest in the region.

    [​IMG]
    The Purang stele discovered in Tibet
    [Credit: China News Service]
    Shargan Wangdue, of Tibet Cultural Relics Protection Institute, said the stele was discovered in Ngari prefecture in northern part of the Tibet autonomous region.

    The stele is 1.85 meters tall, inscribed with the image of a standing Buddha.

    On its left side are 24 lines of old Tibetan language. On its right side are 19 lines of Buddhist prayers.

    Shargan Wangdue said most scholars agree that the stele was set up in 826 or 838, during the period of Tubo kingdom.

    *This stele shows Buddhism was already being practiced during the Tubo period in western part of Ngari," Shargan Wangdue said.

    Read more at https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blog...-stele-discovered-in.html#giO6z6dHLLw0Zkge.99

    * Translation: Occupied Tibet (inverted commas & translation is mine).
     
    Jim likes this.

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