The Extinction Thread

Discussion in 'Cryptozoology: General' started by evilsprout, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Cheetahs facing extinction amid dramatic decline in numbers
    Telegraph Reporters
    27 December 2016 • 7:54am

    Urgent action is needed to stop the cheetah - the world's fastest land animal - sprinting to extinction, experts have warned.
    Scientists estimate that just 7,100 of the fleet-footed cats remain in the wild, occupying just 9% of the territory they once lived in.

    Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest with fewer than 50 individuals surviving in Iran, according to a new investigation led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
    In Zimbabwe, cheetah numbers have plummeted by 85% in little more than a decade.

    The cheetah's dramatic decline has now prompted calls for the animal's status to be upgraded from "vulnerable" to "endangered" on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of threatened species.

    Dr Sarah Durant, from ZSL and WCS, project leader for the Rangewide Conservation Programme for Cheetah and African Wild Dog, said: "This study represents the most comprehensive analysis of cheetah status to date.
    "Given the secretive nature of this elusive cat, it has been difficult to gather hard information on the species, leading to its plight being overlooked. Our findings show that the large space requirements for cheetah, coupled with the complex range of threats faced by the species in the wild, mean that it is likely to be much more vulnerable to extinction than was previously thought."

    The cheetah is one of the world's most wide-ranging carnivores and needs a lot of space. Partly because of this, 77% of its remaining habitat falls outside protected areas, leaving the animal especially vulnerable to human impacts.
    Even within well-managed parks and reserves the cats have suffered as a result of humans hunting their prey, habitat loss, illegal trafficking of cheetah parts, and the exotic pet trade, say the researchers writing in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    In Zimbabwe these pressures have seen the cheetah population plunge from 1,200 to a maximum of only 170 animals in 16 years, a decline of 85 per cent.

    The experts want to see a completely new approach to cheetah conservation focusing on the landscape that transcends national borders and incorporates co-ordinated regional strategies.
    It would involve motivating both governments and local communities to protect the cheetah and promoting the sustainable co-existence of humans and wildlife.

    Dr Kim Young-Overton, from the wild cat conservation organisation Panthera, said: "We've just hit the reset button in our understanding of how close cheetahs are to extinction.

    "The take-away from this pinnacle study is that securing protected areas alone is not enough. We must think bigger, conserving across the mosaic of protected and unprotected landscapes that these far-reaching cats inhabit, If we are to avert the otherwise certain loss of the cheetah forever."

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/12/27/cheetahs-facing-extinction-amid-dramatic-decline-numbers/
     
  2. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    They survived for millions of years, then we arrived and ate them!

    Radiocarbon dating of a fossilized leg bone from a Jamaican monkey called Xenothrix mcgregori suggests it may be the one of the most recent primate species anywhere in the world to become extinct, and it may solve a long-standing mystery about the cause of its demise. The short answer: human settlement of its island home.

    Though the team of specialists who conducted the study says its evidence is indirect, it is consistent with the idea that humans sped the species' extinction through some combination of predation, competition for resources, habitat destruction and introduction of invasive species.

    "Understanding how this extinction happened and what role humans may have played could help us understand how extinctions are progressing today and what we can do to prevent them," says Siobhán Cooke, M.Phil., Ph.D., assistant professor of functional anatomy and evolution at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and lead author of the study, described online in the Journal of Mammalogy on August 1.

    Cooke says the evidence supports the idea that the monkeys survived longer than monkey species on other Caribbean islands—long enough to have overlapped with the arrival of native people from South America, around 800 A.D.

    According to fossil evidence, small primates—a group of mammals that includes humans and our closest monkey relatives—first arrived in Jamaica during the Miocene (23 million to 25 million years ago), probably on mats of vegetation that can form during major weather events, like hurricanes, that could have carried them from the American mainland. ...

    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-08-fossil-evidence-humans-role-monkey.html#jCp
     
  3. amyasleigh

    amyasleigh Abominable Snowman

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  4. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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    What ingredients/amounts are in your Jamaican curry powder? Just wondering how it differs from Indian.
     
  5. amyasleigh

    amyasleigh Abominable Snowman

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    Chief distinguishing feature is that Jamaicans are, apparently, crazy about allspice.

    One and a half tblsp allspice berries
    3 tblsp coriander seeds
    1 tblsp turmeric
    1 tblsp fenugreek seeds
    1 tblsp black pepper
    1 tblsp ground ginger
    1 cinnamon stick
    1 tblsp red chilli powder

    Gently toast all the above, then grind them into powder.
     
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  6. Tribble

    Tribble Furry Idiot

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  7. Min Bannister

    Min Bannister Justified & Ancient

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    So sad. The article seems to have changed from when I saw it but there were several very charming photos of his keepers stroking this huge and scary looking animal.

    I noticed this thread started with the Yangtze River Dolphin. For some reason I feel its loss particularly keenly. There were thousands when I was born and now there are none. Horrible.
     
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  8. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    It was just on the BBC News channel, it may be possible to create more Northern White Rhinos using eggs from the two remaining female Northern White Rhinos and sperm from male Southern White Rhinos.

    Some really nice film of the keepers petting the rhino.
     
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  9. Yossarian

    Yossarian Junior Acolyte

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    They have also preserved sperm and genetic material from Sudan (the last male), so there is the very slim chance the species could be saved - though it's such a genetic bottleneck, it's very unlikely. Rather than coming up with grandiose claims of bringing back woolly mammoths, the people putting their weight behind "deextinction" methods should be considering the prospect of artificially boosting the biodiversity of functionally extinct species like this.
     
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  10. Tribble

    Tribble Furry Idiot

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  11. skinny

    skinny Antediluvian

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