Routes of coincidence: A twin 66?

Discussion in 'Notes and Queries' started by Ermintrude, Jul 19, 2015.

  1. Ermintrude

    Ermintrude Existential pixelfixer

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    Koestler's "Roots" was indeed for me, too, a deus ex machina into Fortean fields...as was his "Ghost"....(in the machine). I seem to remember that much of what I've forgotten, over the years, would be so useful, if only I could remember it all, here and now.

    (ps @rynner2 , I do know that you were an earlier batch than me, but, I reckon that (me, as an early-starter with an ongoing hard-and-hybrid paper-round, you as a ubereducator maritime polymath) we have probably walked, together but seperately, over a lot of recognisably-similar territories of discovery and search. Not necessarily to identical destinations of result or effect, but on a universal scale, oftentimes fairly close)
     
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  2. rynner2

    rynner2 Justified and Ancient

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    I've posted three times before on Koestler's "Roots of Coincidence", all on the Coincidences thread. In the last of those three, in 2005, I said;

    My interest in coincidences and synchronicity sprang from reading
    Arthur Koestler's "The Roots of Coincidence", many years ago.
    Now, by the magic of computers, I've been able to ascertain that the Cornwall library service still has a copy, and I've reserved it, online. (Saves 10p over booking it in person!)
    It'll be interesting to re-read it after all this time - I'll report back when I have !


    But if I did report back, I can't find it now. :(

    However, you may not be missing much - IIRC, I found it slightly disappointing. I suppose it's inevitable that after so many years, the book would not seem so fresh and exciting as it did on a first reading. Plus my own ideas and understanding of the world had also moved on, so it may have been the same book, but it had a different reader.

    (But I'll try another search for my lost report - it might have fallen down the cracks somewhere...)
     
  3. rynner2

    rynner2 Justified and Ancient

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  4. shambles

    shambles Yeti

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    Use it several times a week. It gets a bit snarly through Leigh but I'm on a motorbike and it is quite a lovely road.
     
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  5. rynner2

    rynner2 Justified and Ancient

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    Mostly not as bizarre as the Herald thinks... :rolleyes:
    The 9 most bizarre street names in Plymouth
    By Sarah_Herald | Posted: January 09, 2017

    There are hundreds of roads, streets and cobbled lanes in Plymouth - but have you ever wondered where they get their names? From Bladder Lane to Unicorn Close, The Herald took a closer look at their origins.

    1. Bladder Lane, Manadon


    Bladder Lane, is said to have been named after the plant bladderwort which grew in the meadows (Bladder Meadow) adjacent. However, the street name was changed to Boniface Street, at the request of Boniface's Catholic College who didn't approve of the street in which they were located.

    2. Cockington Close, Leigham


    The term cockington is thought to have come from the Saxon term meaning either 'the settlement near the springs' or 'the place of the red meadow'. The first option is likely to be true for Cockington Close due to the nearby stream which runs into the River Plym.

    3. Plougastel Drive, Saltash

    This tough to pronounce name is possibly linked to the commune Plougastel-Daoulas in Brittany, France which has close ties with the city of Plymouth.

    4. Unicorn Close, Plympton


    This street, unfortunately, is not named after the mythical creature but it is thought to have been named after HMS Unicorn. The naval ship arrived in Plymouth June 18, 1799, before sailing to Brest, France.

    5. Little America



    Little America was given its title after the former US Army base which used to be situated in the same location. The complex stays true to its name, boasting street names such as California Gardens, Oregon Way and Michigan Way.

    6. Donkey Lane, Millbrook

    This bizarre name has an even more bizarre story behind it. Donkey Lane received its title after smugglers used donkeys to transport illicit goods down to Rame Head. On their journey, the thieves stored their stash and kept their mule's overnight in Highland House, Donkey Lane, Millbrook, which is possibly where the name came from.


    7. Cookworthy Road, Camels Head

    Named after William Cookworthy, this road is a dedication to the successful porcelain business owner, who set up his enterprise in the city of Plymouth with his friend John Smeaton who happened to be the designer of the lighthouse [now] on The Hoe.

    8. Soap Street, Millbay

    This newly-named street is bubbling with history, having been named after the Millbay soap factory which was originally located there. Soap Street is, conveniently, located next to Bath Street, which was named after the Royal Reunion Baths, which were demolished in 1849


    9. Pippin Lane, Plymstock

    Titled after a type of apple, such as Cox's Orange Pippin and King of the Pippin, with a sweet pineapple-like taste.

    http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/the...street-named/story-30042380-detail/story.html

     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  6. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    The most unusual name was one I saw in Hull.
    [​IMG]
     
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