Routes of Coincidence: A Twin 66?

Discussion in 'Notes & Queries' started by Ermintruder, Jul 19, 2015.

  1. Ermintruder

    Ermintruder Existential pixelfixer

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    The famous United States interstate road from east to west was of course Route 66.... 640px-Map_of_US_66.svg.png

    The significantly less-romantic but functionally-resonant road in the UK from east to west is of course the A66.....
    2015-07-19 22.09.42.png

    One-twentieth of the size of it's American cousin, but, there is a curious numerological / geographological coincidence that can be perceived.
     
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  2. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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  3. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    Pfft, I sometimes travel on the A666. Now THERE'S a road. :eek:

    Near here there's the A500, known locally as the D Road, D being Latin for 500.
    What've the Romans ever done for us, eh!
     
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  4. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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  5. Ulalume

    Ulalume tart of darkness

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  6. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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  7. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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  8. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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    Canada's Route 66 has a town named Swastika.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika,_Ontario

    :eek:
     
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  9. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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  10. McAvennie

    McAvennie Justified & Ancient

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    I've some friends presently traversing Route 66.
     
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  11. Ulalume

    Ulalume tart of darkness

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    You know, I've often said the Disney/Pixar movie Cars (which deals with Route 66) is the most American movie ever made. In light of this thread, it's too bad that Cars 2 (the British Spy thriller one) didn't even mention the A66. Seems like a real missed opportunity now.

    Well, maybe one day they'll do a Canadian version. Though somehow I suspect it won't be set in Swastika. ;)
     
  12. David Plankton

    David Plankton Justified & Ancient

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  13. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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    Canada has quite a few strange place-names:

    http://mentalfloss.com/article/48761/origins-8-strangest-place-names-canada

    One that did not make that list is "Punkeydoodles Corners".

    A crossroads in the middle of nowhere, allegedly named after the gibberings of a local idiot.

    The story goes that there was some nut who sat at the crossroads in an old chair, singing "Yankee Doodle Dandy".

    But he only knew the first line of the song, so he would sing it over and over, like a skipping record.

    And he didn't know the correct lyrics, so he would sing

    Punkey Doodles came to town,
    Punkey Doodles came to town,
    Punkey Doodles came to town,
    Punkey Doodles came to town...


    And eventually someone named the crossroads after this phrase.
     
  14. GNC

    GNC King-Sized Canary

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    According to Billy Bragg, the A13 is the UK equivalent to Route 66:
     
  15. gattino

    gattino Justified & Ancient

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    This brings to mind the alleged "curse" around the Omen movie, one incident reported to substantiate the claim being that "Special Effects Director John Richardson and his assistant, Liz Moore, were involved in a serious car accident. While Richardson survived, Moore was decapitated. Horrifying as it is, curse theorists point out John Richardson was responsible for a decapitation scene in The Omen, in which David Warner's character is beheaded in famous murderer Ed Gein fashion. Legend holds the scene of the accident occurred at roadmarker "Ommen: 66.6km." Not only was the beasts number present at the site of the accident but it occurred on Friday the 13th of the year 1976."

    Interesting they say "legend holds" as I'm pretty sure the ommen, 66.6 part has been printed and featured in a documentary as a factual detail.
     
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  16. GeorgeP

    GeorgeP Guest

    :D :D :D
     
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  17. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

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    Elsewhere on the Board, I recalled the day the mileage on my car ticked onto 66666.66 miles while driving on the A666 towards Bolton. I joked about it being the Devil's Highway, though I have not had anything untoward happen to me.

    Manchester and National papers are today recording the murder of Salford's "Mr Big" and speculating about a likely wave of retaliatory attacks.

    The linked Guardian piece has a photograph which mentions the closure of Manchester Road at Clifton. It does not mention that the road is otherwise known as the A666. :eek:
     
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  18. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    It occurs to me that some of the younger members here may not have twigged the punning reference in Ermintrude's thread title.

    The Roots of Coincidence is a 1972 book by Arthur Koestler, an introduction to theories of parapsychology, including extrasensory perception and psychokinesis. Koestler postulates links between modern physics, their interaction with time and paranormal phenomena. It is influenced by Carl Jung's concept of synchronicity and the seriality of Paul Kammerer.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Roots_of_Coincidence

    If you did all know this, well, no harm giving it another mention! It helped form my interest in Fortean subjects, all those years ago. :)
     
  19. Frideswide

    Frideswide Princess (PeteByrdie Certificated)

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    is this perhaps because you are The Man? :eek:
     
  20. Frideswide

    Frideswide Princess (PeteByrdie Certificated)

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    Thank you Rynner - and Ermintrude! I have been educated :)
     
  21. Ermintruder

    Ermintruder Existential pixelfixer

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    Koestler's "Roots" was indeed for me, too, a deus ex machina into Fortean fields...as was his "Ghost"....(in the machine). I seem to remember that much of what I've forgotten, over the years, would be so useful, if only I could remember it all, here and now.

    (ps @rynner2 , I do know that you were an earlier batch than me, but, I reckon that (me, as an early-starter with an ongoing hard-and-hybrid paper-round, you as a ubereducator maritime polymath) we have probably walked, together but seperately, over a lot of recognisably-similar territories of discovery and search. Not necessarily to identical destinations of result or effect, but on a universal scale, oftentimes fairly close)
     
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  22. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    I've posted three times before on Koestler's "Roots of Coincidence", all on the Coincidences thread. In the last of those three, in 2005, I said;

    My interest in coincidences and synchronicity sprang from reading
    Arthur Koestler's "The Roots of Coincidence", many years ago.
    Now, by the magic of computers, I've been able to ascertain that the Cornwall library service still has a copy, and I've reserved it, online. (Saves 10p over booking it in person!)
    It'll be interesting to re-read it after all this time - I'll report back when I have !


    But if I did report back, I can't find it now. :(

    However, you may not be missing much - IIRC, I found it slightly disappointing. I suppose it's inevitable that after so many years, the book would not seem so fresh and exciting as it did on a first reading. Plus my own ideas and understanding of the world had also moved on, so it may have been the same book, but it had a different reader.

    (But I'll try another search for my lost report - it might have fallen down the cracks somewhere...)
     
  23. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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  24. shambles

    shambles Devoted Cultist

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    Use it several times a week. It gets a bit snarly through Leigh but I'm on a motorbike and it is quite a lovely road.
     
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  25. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Mostly not as bizarre as the Herald thinks... :rolleyes:
    The 9 most bizarre street names in Plymouth
    By Sarah_Herald | Posted: January 09, 2017

    There are hundreds of roads, streets and cobbled lanes in Plymouth - but have you ever wondered where they get their names? From Bladder Lane to Unicorn Close, The Herald took a closer look at their origins.

    1. Bladder Lane, Manadon


    Bladder Lane, is said to have been named after the plant bladderwort which grew in the meadows (Bladder Meadow) adjacent. However, the street name was changed to Boniface Street, at the request of Boniface's Catholic College who didn't approve of the street in which they were located.

    2. Cockington Close, Leigham


    The term cockington is thought to have come from the Saxon term meaning either 'the settlement near the springs' or 'the place of the red meadow'. The first option is likely to be true for Cockington Close due to the nearby stream which runs into the River Plym.

    3. Plougastel Drive, Saltash

    This tough to pronounce name is possibly linked to the commune Plougastel-Daoulas in Brittany, France which has close ties with the city of Plymouth.

    4. Unicorn Close, Plympton


    This street, unfortunately, is not named after the mythical creature but it is thought to have been named after HMS Unicorn. The naval ship arrived in Plymouth June 18, 1799, before sailing to Brest, France.

    5. Little America



    Little America was given its title after the former US Army base which used to be situated in the same location. The complex stays true to its name, boasting street names such as California Gardens, Oregon Way and Michigan Way.

    6. Donkey Lane, Millbrook

    This bizarre name has an even more bizarre story behind it. Donkey Lane received its title after smugglers used donkeys to transport illicit goods down to Rame Head. On their journey, the thieves stored their stash and kept their mule's overnight in Highland House, Donkey Lane, Millbrook, which is possibly where the name came from.


    7. Cookworthy Road, Camels Head

    Named after William Cookworthy, this road is a dedication to the successful porcelain business owner, who set up his enterprise in the city of Plymouth with his friend John Smeaton who happened to be the designer of the lighthouse [now] on The Hoe.

    8. Soap Street, Millbay

    This newly-named street is bubbling with history, having been named after the Millbay soap factory which was originally located there. Soap Street is, conveniently, located next to Bath Street, which was named after the Royal Reunion Baths, which were demolished in 1849


    9. Pippin Lane, Plymstock

    Titled after a type of apple, such as Cox's Orange Pippin and King of the Pippin, with a sweet pineapple-like taste.

    http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/the...street-named/story-30042380-detail/story.html

     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  26. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    The most unusual name was one I saw in Hull.
    [​IMG]
     
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