Phantom Islands

Discussion in 'Earth Mysteries - The Land' started by gerhard1, Jan 28, 2017.

  1. gerhard1

    gerhard1 Great Old One

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    Quite so, good and noble sir. That seamount, at 3 S, 83 E, is the closest feature in the area that is anywhere near possible, but it is still 11,000 ft below the surface. It couldn't be the islands in question.

    Weird.
     
  2. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...

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    A side note ... I feel condolences are due those involved with cartography during the (Euro) age of exploration.

    The seafarers reporting new geographical items were blundering about without accurate means for even estimating a day's progress, generally sticking close by shorelines they could only sketchily describe. They had no more than a shaky grip on latitude, and longitude was still largely guesswork. Out on the open sea they reported and observed what they happened to encounter, but they frankly didn't (and couldn't ... ) know for certain where they were when they encountered it.

    This seemingly chaotic and futile context for the seafarers' reporting was still arguably better than the cartographers' lot. They had to make sense of all the isolated (and sometimes mutually contradictory) tidbits arriving weeks, months, and / or years after the actual sightings and then assemble a coherent visual representation of the mess.
     
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  3. gerhard1

    gerhard1 Great Old One

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    Quite so. Until the invention of the marine chronometer by Scottish carpenter John Harrison in the mid 18th century that longitude could not be determined with any degree of accuracy. Latitude was much easier to determine.

    Bouvet Island, for example, was removed from navigational charts because longitude could not be fixed with any degree of accuracy and several of the islands mentioned in this thread were incorrectly charted due to errors in calculating longitude. In fact, Captain James Cook when he first sought Bouvet, started about three degrees to the east of Bouvet's position and continued in that direction until he gave up, concluding if memory serves, that Bouvet did not exist. Soon after and due to Cook's and others not finding the island, the Admiralty removed it from the charts. In the 1890's and once more in the 1920's, German survey ships located and correctly charted Bouvet, and it has remained on the charts ever since.

    A related item concerns Thompson Island.

    Here is the wiki article on Thompson.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thompson_Island_(South_Atlantic)
     
  4. gerhard1

    gerhard1 Great Old One

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  5. rynner2

    rynner2 Justified and Ancient

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    WEBSITE:
    http://cornwalltidesreach.weebly.com/index.html
    Yep. The BBC covers this with no mention of The Bermuda Triangle:
    New island forms on North Carolina's Atlantic coast
    29 June 2017

    A new island has formed off the coast of North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore.
    The isle is a mile long (1.6km), depending on tides and weather, and separated from the mainland by a (330ft) 100 metre wide channel.

    It was first spotted by locals as a "bump" above the water in April, according to the Island Free Press.
    Photos taken by a Connecticut tourist have gone viral on Instagram, leading to a boost in curious visitors.
    Photographer Chad Koczera described encountering the island during his visit to Cape Point.

    "My fiancee and I were driving to the point after a storm to collect shells when we spotted an area we couldn't get to by car," he said.

    He described returning for his fifth time to the park, and to visit Cape Point where he had proposed marriage to his then-girlfriend.
    "I sent the drone up to check it out and noticed this beautiful island. We didn't get a chance to make it on to the island because of the strong current."

    The island is littered with old shipwrecks and whale bones that poke through its sands, says local historian Danny Couch.
    Experts say the shores of the Outer Banks are constantly shifting, as sandbars rise above or sink back below the water.

    Park superintendent Dave Hallac has cautioned visitors against trying to swim or walk across the channel to reach the island.
    Currents can swiftly carry away a person, while sharks and sting rays have been spotted in the area.
    Visitors are advised to use a kayak or paddleboard to reach Hatteras Island, as it's been dubbed.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-40438209

    "when we spotted an area we couldn't get to by car" - the American nightmare! :evillaugh:
     
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  6. RaM

    RaM Great Old One

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    The one off Fleetwood continues to grow, the engine block it shows from a Schooner that
    went aground in WW11 that engine used to be visible from here about 3 miles away
    it looked about as big as a long wheel base land rover but you can no longer see it due
    to the island that is now visible at most states of tide.

     
  7. RaM

    RaM Great Old One

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    Some years ago the EU decides from a certain date no further pipelines to dump sewage into the sea
    would be allowed, this led to a spate of new pipelines to beat the ban, big business and governments are
    dead keen on the environment as long as it's not them paying ence the fast action to beat the ban.
    Now at the time we were told that the discharge would be a colorless odorless liquid, anyway it must have
    been a rather thick liquid as the pipe blocked so some bright spark decided to pump compressed air into
    the pipe to clear it only for the pipe to pop up from under the sand and float to the surface.
    "These pipes are the same as the one on the beach in the news and the same thing happened here were
    one pipe floated away and ended up on the beach but they could not refloat it and it had to be cut up".
    Right back to the story, they re dug the trench and by allowing the pipe to fill with water and fitting
    concrete weights managed to sink the pipe into it, they then brought in thousands of tones of stone
    to bury it and hopefully keep it buried.
    It is this stone that many of us suspect is now forming the island off Fleetwood, but now the plot thickens
    as the pipe as now made another brake for freedom likely due to all the stone disappearing and forming the
    island so if things run true to form they will do the same again and dump many more ship loads of stone
    on the pipe that will then migrate to join it's mates now part of the island which will continue to grow.
    It keeps us locals amused at any rate though I suspect the stone including the Island will eventually
    end up in and filling the Fleetwood channel as it is slowly moving this way, then again they may get
    clever and recycle the stone from the island which probably makes to much sense for them to try.

    [​IMG]
    Above is the coffer dam they built to work from,
    and below is the beast'y it's self it is much bigger in real life than it looks on here you can see some
    of the concrete saddles that were supposed to keep it down.
    For every action there is a opposite and often totally unexpected reaction, nature will alway win.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017 at 3:51 PM
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