Out Of Place Animals

Discussion in 'Cryptozoology: General' started by JamesWhitehead, Sep 8, 2002.

  1. GNC

    GNC King-Sized Canary

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    Did the Welsh ostrich fly in from Ayrshire?
     
  2. RaM

    RaM Abominable Snowman

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  3. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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  4. Bullseye

    Bullseye Abominable Snowman

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  5. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    PHOTOS: Rare Seal First For Cornish Sanctuary
    [​IMG]

    4:31pm 12th September 2016

    A seal being cared for in Cornwall could be the first of its kind at the Gweek sanctuary.
    Muddy the Ringed Seal, a breed normally found in the Arctic, was rescued in Plymouth earlier this month after the National Marine Aquarium was alerted by members of the public.

    She was found sheltering on a slipway in Plymouth Harbour with wounds on her tail, flippers and bottom jaw, suffering from tapeworm and she was malnourished.

    Transported to the Cornish Seal Sanctuary by British Divers Marine Life Rescue volunteers, she arrived covered in mud and reluctant to go into the water.

    Initially when rescued, it was thought that Muddy was a Common Seal – a breed not often seen in the area - but staff at the Cornish Seal Sanctuary sought advice from Arctic marine mammal experts believing that Muddy is in fact a Ringed Seal, which is even more unusual for the area.

    [​IMG]

    Staff say that if correct, Muddy will be the first Ringed Seal to ever be cared for by the centre.

    Claire Fraser, Animal Care Team Supervisor, said: “Muddy is extremely lucky to not have more major injuries as she would have had to have travelled through a busy shipping lane to get to where she was found.

    “We are all hoping for the best for Muddy! It is still very early days, she is currently in quarantine and we are monitoring her closely. She is very huffy and feeding on whole fish for herself which is a positive sign.”

    http://www.piratefm.co.uk/news/latest-news/2092970/photos-rare-seal-first-for-cornish-sanctuary/
     
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  6. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    I'm glad she's hungry .. and then the seal farts come along ...
     
  7. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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  8. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Aristocrat Sir Benjamin Slade under fire for offering reward to kill beavers on his Somerset estate
    By WBgdavies | Posted: October 08, 2016

    A South West aristocrat has come under fire for offering a £1,000 reward to kill beavers on his estate - because they are wrecking his trees. Eccentric Sir Benjamin Slade, 70, has erected 'Dead or Alive' posters around his 12-acres of parkland in Somerset.
    He believes the animals have migrated into the nearby River Tone from the River Otter in Devon, where they were re-introduced into Britain in 2009.

    Despite the huge conservation effort to establish a stable population, Sir Benjamin says they are a nuisance and are "breeding like rabbits".
    His wanted posters read: 'Beaver Sightings! at Woodlands Castle. WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE.
    '£1000 reward. For crimes against trees. Beavers have been cutting down our trees!'

    Sir Benjamin, worth a reputed £20 million, said: "You get people shouting about how beavers are wonderful.
    "But they're not, they are a nuisance. They eat the trees and strip them of their bark.
    "They're not endangered. They're endemic. They breed like rabbits and are all over Europe."

    Sir Benjamin put up the posters last week in the hope the beavers would be caught so they could be moved off his estate.
    Conservationists condemned the peer - although experts point out it is not illegal to kill beavers.

    The animals were reintroduced to the wild in 2009 after being extinct in the UK for more than 500 years.
    A colony has now been established on the River Otter and they are believed to have migrated into nearby waterways.
    They have now reached Woodlands Castle, a 17th Century country house near Taunton, which Sir Benjamin runs as a wedding and conference venue.

    Steve Hussey, of the Devon Wildlife Trust, said: "We'd like to make contact with the landowner to see if we can come to another solution that doesn't involve killing beavers.
    "It is true that beavers will cut down some trees but they're not going to fell forests or woodlands or anything like that.
    "You can take very easy straightforward protective measures to stop beavers felling trees.
    "Whenever we have consulted local people on beavers in the past they have overwhelmingly shown their support for beavers.

    "Beavers have been persecuted in the past. It's because of human beings we lost our beavers - they were hunted for their meat, fur and scent glands"
    After being hunted to extinction in the 16th century, beavers were reintroduced into the wild by conservationists in 2009 in pilot projects in Scotland and Devon.
    They are known as a 'keystone species' because of their significant positive influence on the environment.

    Ecologist Derek Gow, who runs a sanctuary for beavers, said: "They're not a protected animal in Britain at this stage so if anyone wants to shoot them they can.
    "But beavers are part of the natural ecology and the only reason they haven't been here is because we have slaughtered them all in the past.
    "Reintroducing beavers is something we should have done a very long time ago. They are a very important species for the natural environment."

    http://www.westbriton.co.uk/aristoc...erset-estate/story-29789688-detail/story.html
     
  9. Min Bannister

    Min Bannister Justified & Ancient

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    This couple bought a new car and found a snake in the back while they were driving home in it. The story doesn't say what became of the poor snake in the end!
     
  10. Bigphoot2

    Bigphoot2 Justified & Ancient

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    http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/dead-polar-bear-corpses-wash-9259632
     
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  11. Bigphoot2

    Bigphoot2 Justified & Ancient

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    They may not be Polar Bears after all...
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-37987334
     
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  12. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    A New Zealand fur seal has been released back into the ocean after being found in a cow paddock near Bega in south-eastern New South Wales.

    Corrie Shepherd had been driving along Tathra Road in Jellat Jellat when she saw the seal come out of a creek near Russell's Bridge. The seal then made its way into a nearby paddock.

    Ms Shepherd called the National Parks and Wildlife Service then waited, keeping an eye on the seal's movements.

    National parks officer Grant Brewer said three officers and three council rangers were involved in the rescue.

    "It looked like it was in a good condition, but it looked very tired," he said.

    "We thought it wasn't a good option to try herd it back into the creek so we thought we'd go to plan B, and catch it."

    The officers used a special seal net which goes over the head of the animal, trapping down its flippers.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-29/fur-seal-rescued-from-cow-paddock-in-south-east-nsw/8076474
     
  13. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Adorable seal photographed a mile inland after escaping sea storm
    Telegraph Reporters
    7 December 2016 • 4:18pm

    Adorable images show the moment a shattered seal was found waddling along a country path in a bid to escape sea storms. The tired pup was found almost a mile away from sea on a popular walking path near Belhaven Bay in Dunbar, East Lothian.

    He is thought to have been caught up in choppy waves and hurled onto the beach not long after leaving his mother’s side. Local walkers were shocked to discover the adorable animal flapping around on the grass verge last Saturday morning.

    An East Lothian Country Park ranger said: “It was actually a member of the public that let us know about the seal.
    He was found just metres from a busy beachside carpark at John Muir Country Park. Wardens from the Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SSPCA) came and rescued the pup and are believed to be feeding him up before setting him back out to sea.

    An East Lothian Country Park ranger said: “It was actually a member of the public that let us know about the seal.
    “He was found not quite a mile up from the beach at Belhaven Bay and had almost reached the carpark - and was knackered by this point.

    “Some times during seal pupping season, the pups will be on the shore while their mums stay in the sea nearby.
    “This one was old enough to be weaned off his mum and had lost all his fur but I think he just lost his way after getting into a bit of difficulty.
    “We do find quite a few pup seals washed on shore if the seas been really rough but you wouldn’t expect to see one as far up as that.”

    Seals spend most of the time at sea, and might swim thousands of miles during their lives in search of food. They come ashore for three reasons, to breed, to moult, and to rest between fishing expeditions.
    The seal is currently extremely underweight but will be released back into the wild once he is back to full strength.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...-photographed-mile-inland-escaping-sea-storm/
     
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  14. lordmongrove

    lordmongrove Justified & Ancient

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  15. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Seal pup rescued in farmer's field seven miles from the sea
    Nicola Harley
    23 December 2016 • 5:11pm

    A seal pup has been rescued after being spotted in a farmer's field almost seven miles from the sea.
    The male pup is believed to have travelled along streams from the sea and ended up in the field.
    He was found in Graig Penllyn, near Cowbridge in the Vale of Glamorgan, on Dec 21.
    Although a rare occurrence, previously seals have been discovered up to 50 miles from the shore.

    This unnamed pup was rescued by RSPCA Cymru and is now being rehabilitated by the charity, which expects to release him in the near future.
    RSPCA Cymru believes the pup must have reached the field after undertaking a journey up the streams of the River Thaw.
    He was found dehydrated and a little underweight.

    Gary Lucas, RSPCA animal collection officer, said: "I've worked for the RSPCA for almost 30 years, and this was my first ever seal rescue – and in quite amazing circumstances.
    "As the crow flies, this amazing seal pup was almost seven miles from the sea and must have reached Graig Penllyn after travelling up the tiniest of streams possible.
    "Thankfully, whilst the pup was a little thin and clearly dehydrated, he seems to be doing okay.
    "It is hoped, after a period in RSPCA care, that he can be released along with other seal pups in the near future."

    A spokesman for the Marine Conservation Society said it is unusual for seals to be found inland.
    "Possibly the field might have been flooded as we found that when water levels are high they come inland with the water," she said. "But it is a rare occurrence."

    Last month a seal pup became disorientated in the River Mersey and ended up at an ice rink in Liverpool.

    Following floods at the end of 2012 there were sightings of seals in Worcester, Bewdley and at the marina in Stourport-on-Severn, about 50 miles from the sea.

    One was named Keith by locals after he remained in the area, his presence caused such controversy with anglers due to him eating the fish that they applied to shoot him.

    A campaign was then launched to save Keith, who to this day still has his own Twitter account. :)

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/12/23/seal-pup-rescued-farmers-field-seven-miles-sea/
     
  16. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Crocodile shark discovered on UK coastline for first time
    The species, named because of its crocodile-like teeth, is usually found off Brazil and Australia
    Ian Johnston
    Thursday 2 March 2017 13:41 GMT

    A crocodile shark – a species that normally lives in tropical waters off Brazil and Australia – has been found on the UK coast for the first time in recorded history.

    The animal was found dead on a beach at Hope Cove near Plymouth, according to the National Marine Aquarium in the Cornish city. [Hope Cove is in Devon, as is Plymouth!! :rolleyes: ]

    Experts have identified it as a crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai.
    James Wright, the museum’s curator, said: “This species has never been recorded in the UK before, as it is normally found in deep waters during the day in tropical climates, such as Brazil and Australia, then coming shallower at night to feed.

    “It is likely to be an isolated incident, but there have been similar stranding incidents in South Africa. This time of year though UK waters are at their coldest so this occurrence is very unusual.”
    He added the shark may have died because the water off the UK was too cold.

    The museum urged anyone seeing other crocodile sharks to report the sightings to establish if this was simply a one-off incident or the start of a new trend.

    As the sea temperature has risen, fish have been moving towards the poles, with some being found hundreds of miles further north than usual.

    According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of species threatened with extinction, the crocodile shark "may be threatened in the near future" as it is vulnerable to being caught as bycatch by long-line fishing boats.

    etc...

    http://www.independent.co.uk/enviro...ime-tropical-hope-cove-plymouth-a7607586.html
     
  17. Roland Deschain

    Roland Deschain All things serve the beam

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    Mods please move if off topic, perhaps to mild strangeness!

    I wonder how many others have seen things a bit out of kilter though fully explicable. I'm guessing quite a few.

    A couple spring to mind.

    • A campsite in Devon 40 years ago. The site is separated from farmland by a wide strip of woodland with a steam running through the middle. The steam is rammed full of guppies, those live bearing tropical fish known so well to fish keepers. It was amazing, a steam of rainbow fish which we just don't have here. Some bugger released at least a pregnant female during a hot summer. Guess the first cold winter snuffed them out.
    • A Jurassic coast cliff, with a small steam running from the cliff top onto the beach. The beach has a huge pile - several cubic meters - of dried, dead and dying tadpoles. When we check out the stream it too is crammed full of tadpoles beyond estimate heading to the same fate. Sad but nothing we could do would help. Nature assuming a balance, however wasteful.
    Disney's lemming need not apply!
     
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  18. henry

    henry still speeding

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    it is rather strange how fish and amphibia can live in gaseous water
     
  19. stuneville

    stuneville Amministratore principale Staff Member

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    New OOP animals thread merged with old OOP animals thread.
     
  20. RaM

    RaM Abominable Snowman

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    About 50 odd years back one of the local mill ponds was full of guppies,
    water was constantly circulated through the processes and so was warm
    even in mid winter.
     
  21. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    Banbury dog walker finds 8ft boa constrictor in field
    21 March 2017

    A dog walker got "a bit of a surprise" when he found an 8ft (2.4m) boa constrictor in a field, the RSPCA said.
    The animal welfare charity was called on Saturday by a member of the public who found the 12.2kg snake near a housing estate in Banbury.
    The charity said it was not known how it came to be in the field.

    Deputy Ch Insp Melanie Fisher said the reptile was now doing well despite the cold weather.
    She added: "I think the caller got a bit of a surprise. It's not every day you stumble upon an 8ft snake while out walking the dog.
    "The snake may have escaped from a vivarium or may have been abandoned. Sadly she's not micro-chipped so we do not know where she has come from."

    The owner is urged to get in touch with the RSPCA by calling its inspectorate appeal line.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-oxfordshire-39346315
     
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  22. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    United strike again!

    After spending two weeks on vacation in Mexico, Richard and Linda Bell were on a United Airlines flight home from Houston to Calgary on Sunday. They thought their adventure was over — until a scorpion fell from the overhead compartment and on to Richard.

    They didn’t immediately recognize the honey-colored, 1.5-inch animal until a passenger sitting next to them pointed out that it was probably a scorpion.

    Richard took the scorpion from his hair and dropped it onto his tray. When he picked it up again, the animal stung him. Bell told Global News Canada that it “felt like a wasp sting.” ...

    http://www.travelandleisure.com/air...tm_medium=&utm_source=&xid=TrueAnthem_Twitter
     
  23. rynner2

    rynner2 Great Old One

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    This adorable video of a puffin rescued in Cornwall being fed in Bude will melt your heart
    By C_Becquart | Posted: April 20, 2017

    An adorable puffin has been captured being fed fish in heart-melting footage after it was rescued miles from home in north Cornwall.
    Kaz Cox, a former veterinary nurse, was walking her dog when she noticed the seabird between two rocks near Crooklets beach at Bude.

    The small black and white seabirds famous for their clown-like multicoloured bill are rarely seen in Cornwall and generally inhabit islands in South West England.
    Kaz said that it was the first time she had seen one in the area where she walked her dog twice a day.
    "I had never, ever seen one before," she said. "I didn't think it was that small but it is so beautiful."


    [​IMG]
    The puffin will soon be back in the wild. Photo: Sue Gear

    As soon as she found it she knew she needed to rescue it and call Sue Gear, who is involved with animal rescue and runs the Born to be Wild Facebook group. She is currently taking care of the seabird and filmed the footage showing how she feeds it small fish.

    Sue, who works as a receptionist in Bude, has saved a lot of animals in the past, including birds of many species, squirrels and rabbits.
    "I do wildlife rescue," she said. "When Kaz rang me I was on my way to pick up an injured pigeon and an hedgehog."

    She said she did some research to make sure she could take care of the puffin before letting it go.
    "We noticed he had a head tilt," she said. "I spoke to people from Lundy Island and did some research to know what puffins eat and need. I am going to feed it for a few days and then will put it back in the wild."

    She posted on her Facebook group: "This beautiful puffin was found on middle beach between Crooklets beach and the sea pool this morning by Kaz Cox. I met Kaz in Bude while picking up injured pigeon and sickly hedgehog. Although it is looking great we have been watching and feeding him all and have noticed he has a head tilt, so I an now wondering if it has had a bit of a knock on the head.
    "Time will tell. I am really pleased I have got him to eat his sand eels. That's got to be a positive sign, fingers crossed for this special little bird."

    http://www.cornwalllive.com/this-ad...t-your-heart/story-30280156-detail/story.html
     
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  24. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    It's not an ostrich, it's an emu ... NSFW for swearing

     
  25. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Pigeon related to dodo found on Australian mainland for first time
    The Nicobar pigeon, which is native to islands in Indian and Pacific oceans, was found by Indigenous rangers near Broome
    [​IMG]
    The Nicobar pigeon, which was found on the Dampier Peninsula near Broome by Bardi Jawi Indigenous rangers. Photograph: Kimberley Land Council
    Friday 5 May 2017 09.25 BSTLast modified on Friday 5 May 2017 12.29 BST

    A rainbow-coloured pigeon native to islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans has been found on the Australian mainland for the first time, by Indigenous rangers working near Broome.

    The Nicobar pigeon, Caloenas nicobarica, the closest living relative to the dodo, is named for India’s Nicobar Islands, more than 4,000km north of Broome.

    Its range extends east from those islands across Malaysia and Thailand to the Solomon Islands. Until it was spotted by a team of Bardi Jawa rangers on the Dampier Peninsula near One Arm Point, an Indigenous community 215km north of Broome, the closest it had been found to the Australian mainland was a lone bird sighted on an oil rig in the Timor Sea in 1989.

    “They saw it walking across the road about 1,600m away from the Chile Creek community,” Bardi Jawa men’s rangers coordinator Phillip “Bibido” McCarthy said, naming a small seasonal community about 10km from both One Arm Point and Lombadina. “Having grown up around here, and knowing all the birds that are around here, they could tell that this was not an Australian animal.”
    The rangers took a quick photo of the animal on their phone and sent it to McCarthy, who sent it on to the Western Australian authorities.

    That was several weeks ago. Since then, there have been a number of other sightings, McCarthy said, with enough differences in the shading of its grey feathers and iridescent rainbow wings to suggest that at least two individuals had taken a sojourn on the Kimberley coastline.

    Some have been spotted pecking at native fruit, plentiful after the wet season, while others appear to be foraging on seeds. ...

    https://www.theguardian.com/environ...st-time?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

    Lovely place Broome, 1 676 kilometers from Perth by air.
     
  26. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Cork public asked to report sightings of rat-like coypu
    Monday, May 15, 2017 by Niall Murray


    A metre-long rat-like mammal has been spreading beyond a small Cork river where it is believed they have been breeding over the last two years.

    The public is being asked to report sightings of any coypus, sometimes mistaken for otters, after one was spotted in or near the River Lee near the Lee Fields in Cork City a week ago.

    It is one of a number seen since last year beyond the Curraheen River, that feeds into the River Lee from the south.

    It is believed that two or three of the rodents were released into the Curraheen River two years ago, near the Cork greyhound track in Bishopstown.

    Since then, the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NWPS) has trapped around 10 coypus on or near the Curraheen.

    But with reports from other locations becoming more frequent, it is now seeking the public’s help to monitor their spread, as it is on a list of major environmental concerns across the EU.

    “Their burrowing can undermine river banks and possibly coastal defences, and they can do a lot of damage to crops, especially root crops that they feed on,” said NWPS south-west region conservation ranger, Danny O’Keeffe.

    With millions of pounds having to be spent in a decades-long eradication programme in Britain, keeping track of their spread is essential to restrict the potential longer-term costs associated with the invasive species.

    The South American natives look like a very large rat, weighing between five and nine kilos, and measuring as long as a metre from the head to the tip of the long tail.

    The coypu has dark fur with lighter ends, a white muzzle, long cylindrical tail and distinctive orange or yellow teeth.

    While the NWPS has caught several coypus on the Curraheen, they have also got reports of sightings seen in a stream near the old rail viaduct on the Cork-Bandon road, south of the Curraheen and in the Monkstown area of Cork’s lower harbour.

    An unconfirmed report also suggests a dead coypu was seen in the northside suburb of Blackpool, which has a number of rivers and streams. ...


    http://www.irishexaminer.com/irelan...eport-sightings-of-rat-like-coypu-450106.html
     
  27. stuneville

    stuneville Amministratore principale Staff Member

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    Baby Alligator found at Chew Valley Lake

    I cycle there from time to time. It's one of Bristol's main reservoirs - lots of fishing and boating, popular picnic area, school tours, etc. How did it get there? Are there more...?
     
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  28. jimv1

    jimv1 Analogue Boy

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    Alligators can lay up to 50 eggs at a time. Interesting rides home lie ahead.
     
  29. stuneville

    stuneville Amministratore principale Staff Member

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    Slightly faster, possibly.
     
  30. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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    How appropriate it was found in Chew Valley. A warning for the future..
     

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