Necrolog

Discussion in 'Fortean News Stories' started by ArthurASCII, Apr 19, 2002.

  1. Yithian

    Yithian Incredulous Staff Member

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    WEBSITE:
    http://petergreenaway.org.uk/drowning.htm
  2. Bigphoot2

    Bigphoot2 Justified & Ancient

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  3. Vardoger

    Vardoger Skeptical by nature

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    I was growing up with M.L. on the Space 1999 show, called Månbas Alpha on Swedish television. Must have been 9 or 10 y.o. when the show was aired.
     
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  4. GNC

    GNC King-Sized Canary

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    Martin Landau was a stalwart of science fiction and horror, and made a lot of cheapo examples in his wilderness years, but I too first knew him as Commander Koenig, and he won an Oscar for a brilliant performance as Bela Lugosi, another psychotronic star who had his wilderness years but unlike Landau never recovered from them. Landau was also nearly Mr Spock on Star Trek! RIP.
     
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  5. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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    link
     
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  6. Draheste

    Draheste Devoted Cultist

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    Space 1999 or Cosmos 1999 as it was called on French TV in the 70's, was one of our favourites series my sister, cousins and I. We used to climb apple trees and pretend they were Eagles going on scary planets. My youngest cousin was inevitably the monster!
    I liked the actors, especially the Professor I found funny at the time. RIP Martin Landau. His name means Pram in french and that made me laugh too!
     
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  7. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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    When I was living in Toronto, the actor who played the Professor (Barry Morse) lived downtown. He was working on various television shows as a narrator and also he did a lot of voice work. He used to ride his old bike all over the place at night, he was very popular with everybody, very charismatic.
     
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  8. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
    I see that for a while before he moved to Canada, Barry Morse lived in Peterborough, UK. Interesting to me as I lived there about 16 years ago.
     
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  9. dreeness .

    dreeness . from the Haunted Swamp

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    He really was a great guy. Charming, witty, urbane, courteous, modest, soft-spoken, you know the kind. He had "presence", just walking quietly through a mall would make people notice him. There used to be a vast shopping complex downtown called the Eaton Centre, he would sometimes stroll through there, and when people recognized him ("You were excellent in The Fugitive!") he would just smile and shrug ("You have an excellent memory, that was so terribly long ago.") And he didn't mind at all talking about his career, he seemed to have endless stories and anecdotes, a brilliant natural raconteur.
     
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  10. Ulalume

    Ulalume tart of darkness

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    A tribute from the Aero Theater in Los Angeles
    AeroTheaterLA.jpg
     
  11. henry

    henry still speeding

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    i missed martin landaus sad passing until just now ... a little known and quite fortean early film of his, welcome home johnny bristol, known by me as charles, vermont, is equal parts jacobs ladder and transdimensional gas station ... also incredible in crimes and misdemeanours woody allens strongest flick for me RIP
     
  12. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    She saw her own death coming, well, sort of: The fortune teller had previously said she would die at an early age from heart failure, but was not worried as she would be "very pretty" in her next life

    A Burmese fortune teller who advised some of South East Asia's most rich and powerful figures has died aged 58.

    Family members told local media that Swe Swe Win, known as ET, died of natural causes on Sunday.

    Her clients reportedly included former Burmese leader Than Shwe and former Thai PM Thaksin Shinawatra, as well as ministers and wealthy business leaders.

    She could not hear or speak so communicated with her clients in writing or through assistants.

    Fortune telling and astrology are still widely trusted in Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) and ET - or E Thi - was one of the country's most famous soothsayers. ...

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-41224643
     
  13. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    You are here: Home / Wildlife Biologist and Sasquatch Researcher John Bindernagel Dies
    Wildlife Biologist and Sasquatch Researcher John Bindernagel Dies
    [​IMG]

    John Bindernagel, 76, passed away during the evening of January 17, 2018.

    John was a great friend to many in the field. I remember talking birds with him when we were together at Craig Woolheater’s conference in Texas, of Bigfoot at Beachfoot in Oregon, and about Sasquatch when at John Green’s tribute in British Columbia. His legacy will be profound.

    [​IMG]

    Texas Bigfoot Conference 2002

    John Bindernagel, Bobby Hamilton, Loren Coleman, Chester Moore

    Photo: Craig Woolheater

    On January 8, 2018, Bindernagel informed his “circle of friends…of just how imminent” his death may be. “After two years of cancer chemotherapy and a year of radiation treatment,…my own terminal cancer is now restricted to pain management.”

    For the last few days, Bigfoot community individuals have been sending messages to online forums and lists telling of their great respect for this gentle man.

    [​IMG]

    John in 2018

    John A. Bindernagel was a wildlife biologist, since 1963. He published a book in 1998 entitled North America’s Great Ape: the Sasquatch, and later in 2010, The Discovery of Bigfoot.

    Bindernagel born in 1941, grew up in Ontario, attended the University of Guelph and received a PhD in Biology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He moved to British Columbia in 1975, largely because the region was a hot spot for Bigfoot sightings. Over the years, he collected casts of tracks that he felt belonged to Bigfoot. He also claimed to have heard the creature near Comox Lake in 1992, comparing its whooping sound to that of a chimpanzee. Bindernagel considered that the Bigfoot phenomena should receive more attention from serious scientists, but once remarked, “The evidence doesn’t get scrutinized objectively. We can’t bring the evidence to our colleagues because it’s perceived as tabloid.”

    He penned the following about himself:

    I am a professional wildlife biologist who is seriously studying the sasquatch or bigfoot in North America. My interest in this animal began in 1963 when, as a third-year-student in wildlife management at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, I was laughed at for raising the report of an animal described as an “ape-man” for possible discussion. My field work began in 1975 when our family moved to British Columbia, partly in order for me to begin field work on this species. In 1988, my wife and I found several sasquatch tracks in good condition in the mountains not far from our home on Vancouver Island. Plaster casts which we made from these tracks provided the first physical evidence for the existence of the sasquatch. Wildlife biologists such as myself regularly depend on tracks and other wildlife sign as evidence for the presence of bears, deer, wolves, and other mammals, recognizing that tracks constitute a more reliable and persistent record of the presence of a mammal species in an area than a fleeting glimpse of the animal itself. I am satisfied that the sasquatch is an extant (or “real”) animal, subject to study and examination like any other large mammal, and am much more concerned with addressing ecological questions such as how it overwinters in the colder regions of North America, than with dwelling on the controversy of whether it does or does not exist. I remain aware, however, that many people—including scientific colleagues—remain unaware of the information that exists about this species.

    Bindernagel Speaks Out Against “Squatch” & “Squatching”
    Before his death, Bindernagel registered the following complaint against the casual shortening of the term, Sasquatch:

    I would be remiss if I did not register my disappointment at the recent and increasingly widespread use of the terms “squatch,” and “squatching,” which denigrates the Halcolmelm (Coast Salish) name Sasq‘ets, anglicized many years ago as “sasquatch,” and which has been more-or-less accepted by the relevant Aboriginal people. ...

    http://www.cryptozoonews.com/bindernagel-obit/
     

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