Nanotechnology

Discussion in 'New Science' started by TheBeast17, Nov 14, 2001.

  1. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  2. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    What could possibly go wrong? Triffids!

     
  3. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    About time we had something new about nanos to worry about. Full text at link.

     
  4. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    I've see these sort of promises before; lets hope it delivers.

     
  5. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  6. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  7. FrKadash

    FrKadash Justified & Ancient

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  8. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    New nanogel for drug delivery: Self-healing gel can be injected into the body and act as a long-term drug depot
    Date:
    February 19, 2015

    Source:
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Summary:
    Chemical engineers have designed a new type of self-healing hydrogel that could be injected through a syringe. Scientists are interested in using gels to deliver drugs because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload over a specified time period.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150219141340.htm
     
  9. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    As nanotechnology makes possible a world of machines too tiny to see, researchers are finding ways to combine living organisms with nonliving machinery to solve a variety of problems.

    Like other first-generation bio-robots, the new nanobot engineered at the University of Illinois at Chicago is a far cry from Robocop. It's a robotic germ.

    UIC researchers created an electromechanical device--a humidity sensor--on a bacterial spore. They call it NERD, for Nano-Electro-Robotic Device. The report is online at Scientific Reports, a Nature open access journal.

    "We've taken a spore from a bacteria, and put graphene quantum dots on its surface--and then attached two electrodes on either side of the spore," said Vikas Berry, UIC associate professor of chemical engineering and principal investigator on the study. ...

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/uoia-tbi032415.php
     
  10. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    A team led by researchers at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science has developed nanostructures made from a compound of three metals that increases the efficiency and durability of fuel cells while lowering the cost to produce them. Their solution addresses vexing problems that have stalled the adoption of this technology.

    Yu Huang, a UCLA associate professor of materials science and engineering, was the principal investigator of the research, which was published in the June 12 issue of Science.

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells have shown great promise as a clean energy technology with numerous applications including zero-emission vehicles. The fuel cells work by causing hydrogen fuel and oxygen from the air to react to produce electricity, and the exhaust they create is water—rather than the pollutants and greenhouse gases emitted by traditional car engines.

    The chemical processes that take place in proton exchange membrane fuel cells are catalyzed by metals. One of those processes is an oxygen reduction reaction, which has typically used platinum as its catalyst. But the high cost of platinum has been a major factor in hindering wider adoption of fuel cells. Scientists have studied alternative catalysts—including using a platinum–nickel compound—but to date, none has been durable enough to be a viable solution. ...

    http://phys.org/news/2015-06-lower-cost-efficient-nanostructure-fuel-cells.html
     
  11. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    One problem that arises with diagnosing medical conditions is that the symptoms of some conditions only arise after a certain amount of time. By the time these symptoms come to the surface, the underlying condition will have progressed to a stage at which its treatment is much more complicated than it would have been had the problem been discovered earlier.

    The most obvious example of this problem would be cancers such as pancreatic cancer that often do not cause any signs or symptoms during their early stages, only causing symptoms once the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

    But this problem is a common one. Another example would be when an implant - a hip implant, for example - becomes infected or inflammation causes prohibitive scar tissue to form. By the time it becomes apparent that a hip implant has become infected, however, the only solution is to remove the implant and insert a new one.

    This week, MNT spoke to Thomas Webster, a professor and chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Northeastern University in Boston, MA, about his team's current work in dealing with this issue.

    "What we quickly realized in our medical care system today is that a lot of what we do is very reactionary," he said.

    In this Spotlight, we take a look at how Prof. Webster and his colleagues are looking to move away from a reactionary model of health care with the development of nanosensors - a new form of technology that will be able to monitor the build-up of bacteria on implants and warn clinicians when treatment is required before the problem escalates.

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/299663.php
     
  12. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    DNA Nanobots Will Target Cancer Cells In The First Human Trial Using A Terminally Ill Patient

    “The very mention of “nanobots” can bring up a certain future paranoia in people—undetectable robots under my skin? Thanks, but no thanks. Professor Ido Bachelet of Israel’s Bar-Ilan University confirms that while tiny robots being injected into a human body to fight disease might sound like science fiction, it is in fact very real.

    Cancer treatment as we know it is problematic because it targets a large area. Chemo and radiation therapies are like setting off a bomb—they destroy cancerous cells, but in the process also damage the healthy ones surrounding it. This is why these therapies are sometimes as harmful as the cancer itself. Thus, the dilemma with curing cancer is not in finding treatments that can wipe out the cancerous cells, but ones that can do so without creating a bevy of additional medical issues. As Bachelet himself notes in a TEDMED talk: “searching for a safer cancer drug is basically like searching for a gun that kills only bad people.”

    This is where nanobots come in—rather than take out every cell in the area they’re distributed to, they’re able to recognize and interact with specific molecules. This means that new drugs don’t even need to be developed; instead, drugs that have already been proven to be effective for cancer treatment but too toxic for regular use can be used in conjunction with nanobots to control said toxicity.” ...

    http://3tags.org/article/dna-nanobo...st-human-trial-using-a-terminally-ill-patient
     
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  13. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    A spot of sunshine is all it could take to get your washing done, thanks to pioneering nano research into self-cleaning textiles.

    Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, have developed a cheap and efficient new way to grow special nanostructures—which can degrade organic matter when exposed to light—directly onto textiles.

    The work paves the way towards nano-enhanced textiles that can spontaneously clean themselves of stains and grime simply by being put under a light bulb or worn out in the sun.

    Dr Rajesh Ramanathan said the process developed by the team had a variety of applications for catalysis-based industries such as agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals and natural products, and could be easily scaled up to industrial levels.

    "The advantage of textiles is they already have a 3D structure so they are great at absorbing light, which in turn speeds up the process of degrading organic matter," he said.

    "There's more work to do to before we can start throwing out our washing machines, but this advance lays a strong foundation for the future development of fully self-cleaning textiles."

    The researchers from the Ian Potter NanoBioSensing Facility and NanoBiotechnology Research Lab at RMIT worked with copper and silver-based nanostructures, which are known for their ability to absorb visible light.



    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-03-nano-enhanced-textiles.html#jCp
     
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  14. kamalktk

    kamalktk Justified & Ancient

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    I presume wearing this clothing this won't skeletonize me? :eek:
     
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  15. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Some Good Nanonews.

    Faster, More Accurate Cancer Detection Using Nanoparticles, Rutgers-Led Study Finds
    Light-emitting nanoprobes can detect cancer early and track the spread of tiny tumors
    By Todd B. Bates December 11,

    Using light-emitting nanoparticles, Rutgers University-New Brunswickscientists have invented a highly effective method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread, potentially leading to earlier cancer detection and more precise treatment.

    The technology could improve patient cure rates and survival times.

    “We’ve always had this dream that we can track the progression of cancer in real time, and that’s what we’ve done here,” said Prabhas V. Moghe, a corresponding author of the study and distinguished professor of biomedical engineering and chemical and biochemical engineering at Rutgers-New Brunswick. “We’ve tracked the disease in its very incipient stages.”

    The study, published online Dec.11 in Nature Biomedical Engineering, shows that the new method is better than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other cancer surveillance technologies. The research team included Rutgers’ flagship research institution (Rutgers University-New Brunswick) and its academic health center (Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, or RBHS).

    https://news.rutgers.edu/faster-mor...rutgers-led-study-finds/20171207#.WjuxTd9l_IX
     
  16. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    More nice nano-news.

    An electricity-conducting, environment-sensing, shape-changing machine the size of a human cell? Is that even possible?

    Cornell physicists Paul McEuen and Itai Cohen not only say yes, but they've actually built the "muscle" for one.

    With postdoctoral researcher Marc Miskin at the helm, the team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. And, they claim, these microscale machines – equipped with electronic, photonic and chemical payloads – could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms.

    "You could put the computational power of the spaceship Voyager onto an object the size of a cell," Cohen said. "Then, where do you go explore?"

    "We are trying to build what you might call an 'exoskeleton' for electronics," said McEuen, the John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science and director of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science. "Right now, you can make little computer chips that do a lot of information-processing … but they don't know how to move or cause something to bend."

    Their work is outlined in "Graphene-based Bimorphs for Micron-sized, Autonomous Origami Machines," published Jan. 2 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Miskin is lead author; other contributors included David Muller, the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering, and doctoral students Kyle Dorsey, Baris Bircan and Yimo Han. ...

    https://phys.org/news/2018-01-physicists-cell-sized-robots.html
     
  17. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Even more nice nano news.

    Cancer-fighting nanorobots programmed to seek and destroy tumors
    Study shows first applications of DNA origami for nanomedicine

    Date:
    February 12, 2018
    Source:
    Arizona State University
    Summary:
    In a major advancement in nanomedicine, scientists have successfully programmed nanorobots to shrink tumors by cutting off their blood supply.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180212112000.htm
     
  18. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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