Lost: Malaysia Airlines - flight MH370

Discussion in 'Fortean News Stories' started by rynner2, Mar 8, 2014.

  1. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...

    Messages:
    3,227
    Likes Received:
    2,013
    Trophy Points:
    113
    LOCATION:
    USA
    Very few aircraft lost at sea became immediate objects of expensive search efforts, so there are relatively few precedents for the response in this case. Air France 447 comes to mind, but that investigation was relatively 'easy' compared to this one, insofar as real-time comms / data had provided investigators a pretty specific approximate search area from the outset.

    IMHO the most significant thing that may derive from locating the wreckage is reaching some sort of conclusion(s) (however tentative; however by-default) about what caused / contributed to the doomed flight's strange behavior and ultimate end that night.

    I believe this - rather than anything about who or what was on the plane - is the issue that will decide whether the search is extended. Furthermore, it appears to me that any decision to pursue an extension has been delegated to Malaysia. As a result, I suspect the deciding factor becomes how enthusiastic Malaysia may be about locating the wreckage.

    The Malaysian authorities haven't exactly displayed a lot of enthusiasm to date. The prospective risks from achieving consensus on cause(s) are highest for the Malaysian government, because:

    - the missing plane was their flag carrier;

    - the government (via a state fund / entity) was the majority shareholder in the airline at the time;

    - the airline has since been re-nationalized (making the government the responsible party for any legal fallout);

    - the most popular default theory (Malaysian pilot suicide) tends to place liability at their doorstep;

    - proof of terrorist / hijacking involvement would direct attention to their security capabilities and competence;

    - the battery cargo fire theory traces back to a major Malaysian industry;

    - etc., etc. ...

    My suspicion is that the Malaysian government worked hard to get China and Australia to agree on terms that set bounds on search continuation *and* left it to Malaysia to make the call on, and presumably foot the bill for, any justifiable extension.

    I'm betting Malaysia stands pat on this agreement, respectfully discontinues further searching at this time, and crosses their fingers that nobody shows up with a precise location or area motivating new efforts (and costs, etc.).
     
    Ermintruder, Frideswide and Coal like this.
  2. Peripart

    Peripart Justified and Ancient

    Messages:
    4,913
    Likes Received:
    1,794
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Regarding battery life in the black box. I don't wish to sound blunt, but 30 days more than enough time to find survivors of a ditching in the sea - by that time, you're just searching for a grave. Of course, it would be great to know what happened to the flight, particularly if lessons can be learned, but in terms of the cheapness of the black box, the budget version is presumably just the life-saving model, without all the bells and whistles.
     
  3. Coal

    Coal Gone full 'folk festival'

    Messages:
    4,322
    Likes Received:
    4,332
    Trophy Points:
    113
    True, but there's no reason form a technical standpoint, the box couldn't have a 'survivors' mode for a number of days, and then revert to (say) a 'location' mode where it essentially wake itself every (say) 6 hours to emit one ping. Even with tiny 8 bit micros, the power used for this would probably be entirely consistent with the emitted power of the 'ping' with almost negligible amounts required for the electronics themselves. Flight Data could recorded onto non-volatile media, think 2 x 64gB Micro-SD cards, or frankly at the cost and size, why not make it four lots for redundancy.

    Why can't you fit planes with a GPS and phone based system to send telemetry automatically every 5 seconds? I bet I can build one with an Arduino and a smart phone. It can be on the outside of the plane and not possible to disable from the inside? OK the whole world doesn't have 3G yet but you see my point.

    While the ruggedness requirements of the black box system is essential and should be kept on, there are plenty of augmentations that could be made that use new and virtually disposable technology which would have got us a lot nearer to this plane in particular, a lot sooner.
     
  4. Peripart

    Peripart Justified and Ancient

    Messages:
    4,913
    Likes Received:
    1,794
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I can't argue with any of that!
     
  5. rynner2

    rynner2 Justified and Ancient

    Messages:
    55,337
    Likes Received:
    8,491
    Trophy Points:
    113
    WEBSITE:
    http://cornwalltidesreach.weebly.com/index.html
    MH370: New analysis reiterates plane's likely location

    Fresh evidence suggests that Malaysia Airlines flight 370 is most likely located to the north of a main search zone, Australian scientists say.
    MH370 disappeared while flying to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur with 239 people on board in 2014.
    Australia, Malaysia and China called off their hunt for the jet in January.

    Analysing drift modelling of a real Boeing 777 wing part for the first time, scientists backed a December report about MH370's likely location.
    That location is an area of approximately 25,000 sq km (9,700 sq miles) lying north of the earlier search zone in the southern Indian Ocean.

    "Testing an actual flaperon [wing part] has added an extra level of assurance to the findings from our earlier drift modelling work," said Dr David Griffin, from Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).
    Earlier modelling had used replicas of a flaperon recovered from Reunion Island, the report said.

    "We've found that an actual flaperon goes about 20 degrees to the left, and faster than the replicas, as we thought it might," Dr Griffin said.
    "The arrival of MH370's flaperon at La Reunion in July 2015 now makes perfect sense."

    Last year, Australia's Transport Minister Darren Chester said the December report would not be grounds for a new search because it did not give a "specific location" for the aircraft.
    Speaking on Friday, he reiterated that position but said the report had been sent to Malaysia for consideration.
    "Malaysia is the lead investigator and any future requests in relation to searching for MH370 would be considered by Australia, at that time."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-39663395
     

Share This Page