Growing Old—Death Approaches!

Discussion in 'The Human Condition' started by rynner2, Feb 15, 2006.

Are you growing older?

  1. Yes, I am

    32 vote(s)
    58.2%
  2. No, I'm getting younger

    13 vote(s)
    23.6%
  3. Sorry, I don't understand the question

    5 vote(s)
    9.1%
  4. I'm a Mod; I think adding silly polls to chat threads is pointless

    5 vote(s)
    9.1%
  1. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Not just German, an old geezer in England had this bomb sent to him.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    I don't want to get all maths-y on you, but - strictly speaking - you achieved that objective every year.

    maximus otter
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017
  3. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    "Large, tasteless, useless vegetable holding marrow."

    maximus otter
     
  4. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Laugh all you will but I predict a marrow victory for him soon!
     
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  5. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    "Thou hast conquered, O pale [Islingtonian]; the world has grown grey from thy breath..."

    (With apologies to A.C. Swinburne)

    maximus otter
     
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  6. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...

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    Yeah - I could have phrased it better ... What I meant was that the objective was to get all the way to the 'finish line' (retirement age) without ever having worked on my birthday.
     
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  7. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    No permanent damage.

    The owner of a hair salon has said it was a miracle no-one was hurt when a 92-year-old customer drove her car through the window of the premises.

    Wendy Cassidy, owner of Cuttin' Crew in Skegness, said the car ploughed into the waiting area of the salon.

    "We thank God there was no-one there, or it could have been a very different scenario," she said.

    The woman, who is a regular customer, was trapped inside the vehicle by broken glass but was otherwise unhurt.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-41902942
     
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  8. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    Grandad rings an erotic massage parlour (safe for work)

     
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  9. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
    His face looks weird. Most likely digitally superimposed with one of those daft camera apps.
     
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  10. uair01

    uair01 Justified & Ancient

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    This is cool! I have a lot of respect for this man. Reminds me of Montaigne's essays:

    A real-life case study, published on New England Journal of Medicine, documents the ethical dilemma that a Florida hospital faced after a 70-year-old unresponsive patient arrived at the hospital. The medical staff, the journal notes, was taken aback when it discovered the words "DO NOT RESUSCITATE" tattooed onto the man's chest. Furthermore, the word "NOT" was underlined with his signature beneath it. The patient had a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation. Confused and alarmed, the medical staff chose to ignore the apparent DNR request -- but not without alerting the hospital's ethics team, which had a different take on the matter.
     
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  11. PeteS

    PeteS Ephemeral Spectre

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    A strange case indeed and a very balanced approach taken by the authorities. In the other case mentioned where the patient had a DNR tattoo which didnt reflect his current wishes why I wonder did he not just simply have the "not" removed?
     
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  12. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    He didn't want to be resuscitated. The medical team overrode his wishes, which they can do legally and ethically as the default position.

    There are sound reasons for this: most people would want an attempt to be made to revive them including some even who've asked not be once it's imminent, plus the attempt might not work anyway, plus the staff would want to do everything they can for various reasons including the fear of retaliation from relatives.

    Resuscitation is a messy business. I have been present at plenty, including when it's been done for someone who who'd asked not to be. His stepdaughter was working nearby (in the hospital) and she asked for it to be done. It succeeded and I had to help clean him up afterwards. He play-thumped me, bless him. I knew what he meant.
     
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  13. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Vid at link

    Castleford woman, 98, plays donkey in care home nativity play
    A 98-year-old woman is playing the donkey in her first nativity play at a care home in Castleford.

    Staff at Newfield Lodge Care Home have teamed up with the residents to put on their first production for the public.

    The cast, which includes an 87-year-old shepherd, have a combined age of nearly 350 - not counting the staff!

    • 05 Dec 2017
    http://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-engla...an-98-plays-donkey-in-care-home-nativity-play
     
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  14. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    Staff complied with the sentiment expressed in the tattoo and let the patient die.

    The hospital subsequently paid the deceased’s family $100M dollars in settlement when it was revealed that it was just the name of his favourite Death Metal band
    ...”

    Fans of Brain Drill, Cadaver, Cannibal Corpse, Septic Flesh etc. may wish to reflect on potential outcomes before tattooing commences.

    maximus otter
     
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  15. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    I worked as a NHS HCA level 3 Skargy, this was at the Geoffrey Hodge's building, Ward 42 at The Queen's Hospital, Burton On Trent during '00 -'02 (we were the ones I was later told that got on the national news because a load of us volunteered to sleep in the day room and work for free when parts of Burton were flooded and the other staff couldn't get there) ... anyhoo ...

    We had a white board with all the patients names and brief details in a box grid pattern in the Sister's office (this was a care of the elderly ward and was also back when patients names were still written above their beds) .. I'd noticed that some of the patients names had round blue stickers next to them and it was explained to me that that meant they were not for resuscitation, on that level only they were called 'blue spots' as part of our handover. I assume that wasn't just dreamed up by our ward Sister but it was the only ward I worked on that I saw those stickers used. As HCA's we were often the first to find unresponsive patients so were also trained to dial 333 to get a crash team there quickly, our practical role was to make as much space around the bed as possible, close the curtains around the other beds and get everything the arriving team might need as quickly as possible (oxygen lines and tanks, neb masks, sterile equipment etc on a small stainless steel table on wheels) .. it never took more than 5 minutes for them to arrive so we'd commence CPR until then. We were never told off for that if a patient was a 'blue spot'.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  16. PeteS

    PeteS Ephemeral Spectre

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    I "liked" this post but perhaps not an appropriate subject for this( perhaps a "thank you" button better?) I wonder whether the situation is diiferent re recuscitation nowadays with the possible legal wrangles which ensue.
    Ms Petes deals with a lot of end of life care and has to notify deaths on a certain telephone number within a very short space of time. On a rather macabre note the first question she gets asked is whether the resident is still breathing. Makes the conversation a touch difficult.
     
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  17. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    She either has to say yes or no I suppose ? .. on the occasions I've had to dial 111 for someone else I'm worried about, that's also one of the first questions, after "Are you calling for yourself or someone else ?"

    The last professional capacity one of those I had to deal with was John who was dead on his kitchen floor at 7am, he was cold to the touch, pinching his ear didn't work or shouting in his ear, his tongue was sticking up like a sundial and he had a burnt spot on his head because his heating had kicked in and his head was resting against his radiator. John always got up at 5am to give himself a shower in his wet room .. the floor of the wet room was dry when I checked .. John had been dead for about an hour and a half. I called 999 but I knew he was dead .. my boss told me off for making that decision, I waited for the police officer to arrive, and then the undertakers, pointed out the gun he'd been given by his brother that he had mounted on his living room wall to the officer, my boss tipped me off to leave the house at the same time as the officer so I couldn't be accused of stealing anything by his estranged grasping daughter. His Care folder/daily diary was tucked inside my jacket, my boss pulled up in her car, I didn't feel in the mood for a chat because I was fond of the old man, I gave her his care folder then went to see my next service user. All in all, a shit morning for everyone.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  18. PeteS

    PeteS Ephemeral Spectre

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    Ms Petes has less patience with call centres than even I do, so I gather the response is usually "he/she has died".
     
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  19. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    The correct answer. Send her my regards X
     
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  20. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    A colleague of Techy's died at work yesterday, we think of a heart attack. Techy'd last seen him a few days before and noticed how red his complexion was. (He's learned to notice that from me, as I always remark to him 'He looks strokey!' if we see someone with a turkeycock colour!)

    The poor bloke was being worked on for over 40 minutes, first by colleagues and then paramedics, in an open area where everyone passing could see him from stairs and balconies. He was eventually carted off, still receiving treatment.

    Techy feels a bit traumatised by the experience. He said 'It's not like on Casualty is it!'
    No, Techy, it's not.

    Gave him a jolt though. He spent an hour on the exercise bike!
     
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  21. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    No it's not, three quarters of the staff aren't models and none of the blokes are rocking designer stubble .. most of them aren't shagging each other, 50% of them are probably hung over 50% of the time and they're all over worked. And under paid.

    edit: and none of them smoke it seems.
     
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  22. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    And fat too, we hear.
     
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  23. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    Yeah, there's definitely never fat people working on wards .. or bitchy back stabbing or career climbing student nurses that are revolted by the idea of actually talking to patients.
     
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  24. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    Some of the staff I've worked with were so immense that I was surprised they could bend over to make a bed. Not healthy.
     
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  25. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    The last time I was an inpatient, I used to get so bored I'd offer to help the HCA's make my bed .. I noticed they don't do hospital corners anymore or smooth out the sheets afterwards so there's no wrinkles .. or put the fresh pillow slips on so the opening is facing towards the windows although I wasn't a dickhead so didn't mention it. I put that down to the fact that they've got their priorities right these days .. patient care instead of cosmetic details due to worsening conditions although encouraging patients to drink enough water didn't seem as much a priority from my days sadly ... I ended up nicking some straws from the customer cafe and dishing them out and topping water up for patients so probably pissed some of my nurses off :) (only the crap ones though) ..
     
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  26. Min Bannister

    Min Bannister Justified & Ancient

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    Re. DNRs and so on. I almost don't want to post this as it is so awful but it is part of it. A woman who made a living will to ensure she was allowed to die if she became unable to look after herself was kept alive for nearly two years when the hospital mislaid her paperwork.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-coventry-warwickshire-42240148

     
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  27. PeteS

    PeteS Ephemeral Spectre

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    I still have shuddery moments re my mothers death a handful of years ago. She had a massive stroke at Christmas and would not have recovered, although still had some elements of recognition. She had told me a few years before that she never wanted to be "brought back". Nothing in writing though. Being the only one able to make the decision I agreed she should go on the "pathway" . She lasted a few days after I had to remove her from the "care" of the NHS to a home which Ms Petes managed . Passed away peacefully with her favourite Christmas carols playing in the background . I still wonder whether I misrembered what she said or whether she had changed her mind. May find out eventually.
     
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  28. Min Bannister

    Min Bannister Justified & Ancient

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    That sounds like the nicest possible way to go given the circumstances. :nods:
     
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  29. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

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    I've just read about this in the Times and was looking for a link so thank you!
    The mittens incident implies that she knew what was going on and wanted to protest, how awful.
     
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  30. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...

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    Don't dwell on it - such retrospective second-guessing accomplishes nothing beyond torturing yourself.

    My late brother was a pretty obviously terminal cancer patient who'd insisted on my commuting 400 miles to help him with various events and situations (which, for the record, I did ... ). This was exacerbated by his known longstanding emotional issues as well as the then-unknown strong animosity he'd secretly harbored toward the family generally and myself specifically.

    During his year-long battle with cancer he commonly operated in a secretive and furtive manner. This, combined with his sometimes arrogant penchant for info-compartmentalization, resulted in periods (of up to multiple weeks) during which none of us knew where he was, what he was doing, etc. There were multiple occasions when he went MIA, only to be finally tracked down in the hospital - where he'd specifically denied notification privileges for all family members, including his sole next of kin (me).

    At the time of the end game (as it turned out, less than 4 weeks prior to his death) I made the long trip to chauffeur him to a conference with his treatment team, during which final arrangements were discussed. In that meeting he denied having a DNR order of record.

    Circa 3 weeks later he went MIA again. It took more than 24 hours to determine he'd collapsed at home and entered the hospital - once again disallowing notification to next of kin. On the day following his re-discovery his attending physician phoned me to state he was declaring my brother incompetent to make treatment decisions and formally charging me with decision making authority.

    Circa 1700 on a Friday afternoon my brother's life was literally put in my hands. To complicate matters, the worst blizzard for 20 years was underway in our hometown area (closing all roads for the next few days). After extensive Q & A with the doctor I swallowed hard, screwed my courage to the sticking point, and instructed him to treat it as a DNR case and transfer my brother to the hospice adjacent to the hospital.

    The requisite paperwork (including DNR documentation) was generated by hospital and hospice staff who'd managed to get back to their offices during the storm and faxed to me - standing by at my local copy shop only 15 minutes before closing time. I signed (etc.) everything as it came off the fax machine, it was all transmitted back, the shop closed, and I headed home in a state of grim shock. Pink's 'Please Don't Leave Me' came on the radio, forcing me to park and break down crying (a very rare occurrence).

    I was waiting for the roads to open to go be with him, but he died early the following Monday morning while the relevant routes were all still closed.

    It wouldn't be until a month later that a family friend (whom my brother had endlessly exploited for errands, rides, etc.) delivered a package of papers my brother had placed in his keeping. It included a signed and witnessed DNR order, dated long before his denial of such a thing and his refusal to discuss the issue with me.

    If my brother had bothered to advise me this documentation existed, it could have saved me a month of self-torture and second-guessing.

    My point is this ... You have to make the call based on your best judgment and your best knowledge of the patient's wishes. As long as you can look in the mirror and tell yourself you did the right thing in the context as you knew it in the moment, you have to accept it, let it lie, and put it behind you.
     

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