Forgotten History

Discussion in 'Urban Legends & Folklore' started by McAvennie, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

    Messages:
    27,454
    Likes Received:
    11,591
    Trophy Points:
    284
    LOCATION:
    Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
    He looks totally relaxed and having fun - I've never seen a pic of Jeremy Thorpe smiling before. Excellent find.
     
  2. Spookdaddy

    Spookdaddy Cuckoo

    Messages:
    5,082
    Likes Received:
    2,275
    Trophy Points:
    219
    LOCATION:
    Midwich
    Yes. A man of great potential - including the potential to self-destruct.

    I’d recommend reading the aforementioned book alongside An English Affair: Sex, Class and Power in the Age of Profumo by Richard Davenport-Hines.

    Although the Thorpe trial was in the 70’s I’m pretty sure Thorpe’s relationship with Scott was more or less contemporaneous with that between Profumo and Keeler. One was a storm in a teacup which ruined the lives of many, and ended the life of one, the other resulted in the aborted commission of a very serious crime – but both say a lot about society in the 60’s early 70’s.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2017
  3. RyoHazuki

    RyoHazuki Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    359
    Likes Received:
    333
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Last refuge of the Druids
    I happened to hear a radio interview today with a survivor of the Bethnal Green tube station disaster, as the memorial was unveiled last month. Shockingly, I had absolutely no knowledge of the event at all (although if I'd heard it mentioned in passing, I may well have mentally confused it with the Balham bombing). The combination of a totally unnecessary tragedy and blatant ass-covering by senior figures afterwards in the name of 'morale' is appalling to read about.

    Plenty of info here and here.
     
  4. Cochise

    Cochise Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    3,712
    Likes Received:
    2,168
    Trophy Points:
    159
    LOCATION:
    Gwynedd, Wales
    Wow. I knew about the disaster but I had been left with the idea that it had been caused entirely by the panic. This probably should be in Conspiracies.

    This is why I like these boards so much - there are always things coming up that challenge your previous view.
     
  5. escargot

    escargot Beloved of Ra

    Messages:
    20,179
    Likes Received:
    9,041
    Trophy Points:
    284
    LOCATION:
    Farkham Hall
    I remember it very well. At the time it wasn't taken seriously. The details were too ludicrous and nobody involved was in any real danger, apart from the poor dog, so each day's tabloid revelations of the trial seemed comical rather than shocking. You'd read bits out to your workmates at tea break and everyone'd guffaw.

    There were lots of ribald jokes.One was to say solemnly 'It's his (Thorpe's) poor wife I feel sorry for. I'm sure she doesn't know which way to turn.' Him being bisexual, y'know. It was seen as hilariously vulgar back then.
     
    Cochise likes this.
  6. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

    Messages:
    17,095
    Likes Received:
    16,602
    Trophy Points:
    279
    Min Bannister, poozler and escargot like this.
  7. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

    Messages:
    10,598
    Likes Received:
    5,777
    Trophy Points:
    309
    LOCATION:
    Manchester, UK
    Here is a subject I thought I knew about but the 3D Film Archive site has dug into lots of contemporary American publications to document, in detail, the history of Hi-Fi in the home. The first part looks at the reel-to-reel tape boom in the early fifties and the curious, early binaural records which required a double-headed pick-up. The second part looks at the first year of stereo LPs - 1958. These are long and detailed pages - essentially a book! For the first time, I began to fully appreciate the extent to which the risks were taken by forgotten, independent companies such as Audiosphere, who also created the demand for stereo:

    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/binaural-or-bust

    http://www.3dfilmarchive.com/first-year-of-stereo-records

    :cheer:
     
    Ermintruder and escargot like this.
  8. uair01

    uair01 Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    720
    Trophy Points:
    129
    WEBSITE:
    http://uair01.blogspot.nl/
    TWITTER:
    uair01
    From a comment here:
    http://marginalrevolution.com/margi.../culture-san-francisco-solve-equilibrium.html

    We had a similar revolution in the late 19th century. Almon Strowger invented the automatic telephone exchange for the explicit purpose of eliminating operators. Strowger was a funeral director, one of two in the town where he lived. He suspected a telephone operator was directing business to his competitor, so he invented the dial telephone and the Strowger switch (used to decode the dial pulses at the central office). Just to get rid of that one operator, he got rid of most operators everywhere. He ultimately sold his company to AT&T for a remarkably low price and went back to being a funeral director.
     
  9. uair01

    uair01 Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    720
    Trophy Points:
    129
    WEBSITE:
    http://uair01.blogspot.nl/
    TWITTER:
    uair01
    Well, yes, people keep chattering along about the American Civil War, well Americans do, but few even realize that we are just approaching the bicentennial of the discovery of the interaction of electricity and magnetism and the subsequent invention of the electric motor. Or that we just had the 70th anniversary of the invention of the semiconductor transistor. And yet, both of these events made the modern world possible.

    From here:
    http://marginalrevolution.com/margi...tance-past-satisfying-knowledge.html#comments
     
    Ermintruder likes this.
  10. uair01

    uair01 Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    720
    Trophy Points:
    129
    WEBSITE:
    http://uair01.blogspot.nl/
    TWITTER:
    uair01
    Same link:

    A visitor of Prague in the early 1600s commented that the smell of the streets is strong enough to stop the Turkish invasion by itself.
     
    escargot likes this.
  11. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

    Messages:
    17,095
    Likes Received:
    16,602
    Trophy Points:
    279
    'Universal Newsreel from 1933 showing Cecil H. Dill, a farmer from Traverse City, Michigan, demonstrating his ability to render popular melodies by pressing his hands together. After the performance, which seems to be of Yankee Doodle, Dill modestly tells how he discovered his unusual talent while staring rather intensely into the camera.'

    http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/farmer-plays-a-song-with-hand-farts-1933/
     
  12. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

    Messages:
    27,454
    Likes Received:
    11,591
    Trophy Points:
    284
    LOCATION:
    Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
    How could he keep a straight face?
     
  13. Andy X

    Andy X Portent

    Messages:
    2,461
    Likes Received:
    2,391
    Trophy Points:
    154
    LOCATION:
    Larch Forest
    A chap I've worked with for many years knew Jeremy Thorpe well as he lived nearby or something - I forget the details. At any rate he was a friend of the family and much liked. They even had a photo of my friend and his brother with a smiling JT proudly displayed on the mantlepiece. When the scandal broke the boys' mother cut off the Thorpe part of the print and re-framed it as it was, after all, a nice picture of the kids.

    I used to love the Giles cartoon annuals when I was a lad and was baffled by some of the older ones featuring Thorpe, who was always pictured as looking intensely miserable. So I knew that he'd been a politician and famous for his gloomy demeanour and that he'd done something very shocking which only grown-ups knew about. ..but mainly he always looked unhappy. I imagined him as a kind of bipedal Eeyore in a sombre suit.
     
    AgProv, escargot and Ermintruder like this.
  14. Kingsize Wombat

    Kingsize Wombat Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    436
    Trophy Points:
    64
    https://dangerousminds.net/comments/henry_viiis_bizarre_horned_helmet
     
  15. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

    Messages:
    17,095
    Likes Received:
    16,602
    Trophy Points:
    279
    Years of practice.
     
  16. AlchoPwn

    AlchoPwn Devoted Cultist

    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    263
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Here is a little piece of forgotten history. This seems to be the most forgotten piece of WW2. Namely the Franco-Thai War of 1940.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franco-Thai_War

    In short, after the fall of France, French Indo-China went Vichy. They were then forced to allow the Japanese to set up bases in the territory. The Thai government sensed weakness in the colony and decided the time was ripe to attack and reclaim certain territories lost to France. Ultimately a ceasefire was negotiated by Japan who subsequently used this to occupy both nations.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018 at 6:23 PM
    chicorea and AgProv like this.
  17. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    I got the uneasy feeling I was looking at Abraham Lincoln without the beard - same undertaker's melancholia. Abraham Lincoln without the talent, possibly.
     
    AlchoPwn and Andy X like this.
  18. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    Interesting. could this explain why the vampire mythos never really took off in Britain the way it did in Europe - more by luck than planning it was realised there was a more plausible reason why things could be unquiet in the grave and people took more time to observe as to WHY a body you buried yesterday might want to come back today? (Occams razor and all that). "Don't be daft, he can't be Count Ulthang of Ruritrania, not with a Smethwick accent like that, it really IS Uncle Dennis, you'll have to wait for the inheritance".
     
    AlchoPwn and Swifty like this.
  19. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    In 1919, there would still have been men serving in the British armed forces who'd been part of the first concentration camps in South Africa twenty years before. People with experience administering the camps during the Boer War would have been shoe-ins for similar set-ups elsewhere - it's interesting to read the account and to see the camps in Russia went to the bad in exactly the same way and for exactly the same reasons - over-crowded, underresourced, insanitary, failing not out of intent to cause harm but because of bad management... still a bad memory in South Africa today.
     
    chicorea, AlchoPwn and ramonmercado like this.
  20. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    Interesting! One of the things I found eye-opening about the ACW is that California was a participant - somewhat detached from the rest of the USA at the time, you'd have thought they'd have sat it out on the sidelines - but no, the one westerly state, seperated from everything else by 1500 or so miles of midwest and the Rocky mountains, was in there too. initially there were local battles - well, skirmishes - in southern California between Union and Confederate Californians as to which side the state should take, so some local fighting went on there. There was talk of a Confederate relief force travelling overland out of Texas to support the Confederacy there, but it would have had to cross present-day Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada with no roads, a desert or two, a mountain range, not to mention things like Kiowas and Apaches, so the idea was dropped. California having sorted out its internal conflicts and declared for the Union, the state then sent less than a full regiment of infantry East to fight - they had to go the long way by ship round the bottom of South America and then up again... a very minimal presence, but they were in there.
     
  21. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    Of course, this is a recording of very old men recreating the Rebel Yell of their youth, but it's probably as near to authentic as you'll ever get... recorded for posterity at one of the last old soldiers' reunionins in the early 1930's as a late swan-song.

     
    chicorea and maximus otter like this.
  22. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

    Messages:
    1,354
    Likes Received:
    1,842
    Trophy Points:
    184
    LOCATION:
    You don't have the "Need to Know"
    As someone who has a keen interest in sniping, one of the earliest practitioners was Truman "California Joe" Head. He left a fortune in gold behind in California to join the 1st. California, then transferred to Berdan's Sharpshooters.

    On a related note, whatever you do watch Ken Burns' magisterial TV series The Civil War. It's one of the few pieces of telly work that I can honestly describe as unmissable.

    maximus otter
     
    chicorea, AgProv and AlchoPwn like this.
  23. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    To me, that's a lost script for an episode of Father Ted... the new nun arriving on Craggy Island seems nothing out of the usual (for Craggy Island) but there are lots of subtle little things that don't add up, and which make Ted Crilly very uneasy undeed. Finally, Sister Michaela is revealed when she takes Bishop Len hostage at gunpoint, wishing to debate the traditionally ambivalent attitude of the Church heirarchy to the Republican movement...
     
    ramonmercado likes this.
  24. AgProv

    AgProv Master of Uncertainty and Doubt

    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    445
    Trophy Points:
    64
    LOCATION:
    Manchester-ish
    There are accounts of British and American pilots who did exactly this. If the target was in Southern Germany or Northern Italy, this offered the opportunity for a colluding bomber crew, who'd simply had enough, to claim combat damage or malfunctioning navigational gear had set them off-course and their only option was to force-land in Switzerland - where the crew would go into benevolently applied internment for the duration. Regular and better meals, an easy regime, and in one case local passes from the internment camp to go ski-ing. Other crews headed for Sweden for much the same reasons. Strangely enough, Spain wasn't as popular, (although bombing raids over southern and western France ceased after mid 1944 so the opportunity ceased). for completions' sake, British pilots interned in neutral Ireland - usually for legitimate reasons - weren't in much of a hurry to be repatriated either. Better meals and a laid-back host country were the usual reasons here (apart from less chance of getting killed).

    Just got to the end of this thread after reading all fifty-seven varieties of fascinating page...
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018 at 9:10 PM
    Swifty and chicorea like this.
  25. Kingsize Wombat

    Kingsize Wombat Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    436
    Trophy Points:
    64


    http://allthatsinteresting.com/exploding-pants-new-zealand
     
    AgProv, maximus otter and Ermintruder like this.
  26. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

    Messages:
    1,354
    Likes Received:
    1,842
    Trophy Points:
    184
    LOCATION:
    You don't have the "Need to Know"
  27. Kingsize Wombat

    Kingsize Wombat Ephemeral Spectre

    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    436
    Trophy Points:
    64
    I vaguely remembered seeing something like that on TV - couldn't remember where though.
     
  28. Dr_Baltar

    Dr_Baltar Justified & Ancient

    Messages:
    2,071
    Likes Received:
    329
    Trophy Points:
    99
    LOCATION:
    Bohemian Groove
    The BBC/Russell T Davies film of the book is currently in production.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2017/a-very-english-scandal-first-look-casting
     
  29. Spookdaddy

    Spookdaddy Cuckoo

    Messages:
    5,082
    Likes Received:
    2,275
    Trophy Points:
    219
    LOCATION:
    Midwich
    That'll be interesting. Hmm, I wonder if Hugh Grant has read the book - and is prepared for what might be expected of him. Thorpe could be quite graphic in describing his escapades, and the relative talents of those he escapaded with; dangerously graphic, one would think - given the attitudes of the time.
     
  30. GNC

    GNC King-Sized Canary

    Messages:
    22,191
    Likes Received:
    5,887
    Trophy Points:
    284
    The last ever episode of Monty Python (from late 1974) features a man in a rubber Jeremy Thorpe mask who keeps showing up in the background and waving. Which begs the question... was somebody producing Thorpe masks in 1974? Couldn't have been a huge seller, I would have thought.
     

Share This Page