Forgotten History

Discussion in 'Urban Legends & Folklore' started by McAvennie, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    Four Blackjacks (liquorice chews) were 1d. Mars Bars were 6d. A quarter pound of fudge from Woolworths was 11d.

    Paraffin (boom-boom boom-boom, Esso Blue!) was 2/- per gallon, and you took your own can to the dispenser. Health & Safety nightmare!

    Sorry, l can’t recall the price of tofu or quinoa...

    :rolleyes:

    maximus otter
     
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  2. Coal

    Coal Gentleman, scholar, acrobat.

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    I'm frankly amazed more us olds didn't die from paraffin heater fumes.

    I tried tofu once. I'm now nearly aligned with Beecham (allegedly), in that one should try everything once, except for Morris dancing and tofu.
     
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  3. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    I found this quite interesting ..

    If this government keeps cutting like it is doing some people might find this very interesting.
    They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot & then once a day it was taken & Sold to the tannery.......if you had to do this to survive you were "Piss Poor
    But worse than that were the really poor folk who couldn't even afford to buy a pot......they "didn't have a pot to piss in" & were the lowest of the low
    The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500s:
    Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and they still smelled pretty good by June.. However, since they were starting to smell . ...... . Brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odour. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting Married.
    Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water!"
    Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof... Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."
    There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.
    The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "Dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold.
    In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat.
    Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.
    Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust.
    Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would Sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial... They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake.
    England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins was found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive... So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a dead ringer.
     
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  4. Naughty_Felid

    Naughty_Felid No longer interesting

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  5. Naughty_Felid

    Naughty_Felid No longer interesting

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  6. Naughty_Felid

    Naughty_Felid No longer interesting

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  7. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    Well stop pissing about on Fortean Times and get on with it then ! :p
     
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  8. Naughty_Felid

    Naughty_Felid No longer interesting

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  9. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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  10. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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  11. RaM

    RaM Abominable Snowman

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    Strange how thing pass into history and how quickly they are forgotten,
    was looking at a article about Bury my home town, well someone had to
    come from there, they are unsure of were Union Square used to be, I often
    walked through it in the 50's and 60's it is now under a large retail area.
    It was a large area big enough for a medium car park with a road round
    the edge and a very ornate lamp right in the middle, it had a reputation
    for slightly strange happenings and thought I can find no info on it there
    was at the time a news article to the effect that lightening had struck the
    square a day or so later I was walking through and noticed the lamp
    had gone not the slightest bit left only a large crater right were it had
    been always puzzled me what happened to it, I find it hard to believe
    it was lightening. I think the lamp was gas powered and seem to remember
    seeing a pic of the crater smoking so maybe if it was lightening it ignighted
    the gas main under the lamp and blew it up of the hole, It was certinly
    a very neat job.


    [​IMG]
     
  12. PeteS

    PeteS Ephemeral Spectre

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    I remember Union Square from the 60's when I used to visit Bury. Covered by a "modern" precinct which I think was subsequently demolished and replaced by the current one. If left alone I suspect the original terrace properties would have still been standing 100 years from now.You can just envisage it can't you. All the front elevations cleaned up. The square block paved and nice in keeping street furniture and lighting and those trees nice and mature. hey ho.
     
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  13. RaM

    RaM Abominable Snowman

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    I was with this lot for a short time the last scenes show the appliances
    parked up on Union Square.




    Those pumps you see being carried about were called light weight pumps,
    would not want to move a heavy one, the engine in them was a Coventery
    Climax a slightly detuned Hillman Imp engine fitted with a magneto.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017
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  14. Swifty

    Swifty The Great Glass Elevator

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    The roaring US 20's in colour ..

     
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  15. Bullseye

    Bullseye Abominable Snowman

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    Like MO says, it was'nt that bad but I remember the news that a couple of old folks killed themselves because it "was too confusing"................you know, 100 pennies to a pound as opposed to 12 pennies to a shilling,20 shillings to a pound, then there were florins,half crowns, 10 bob notes.By the way, I'm sure crisps were 3d a bag in the 60's.
     
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  16. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    Old money was SO confusing, yes.
     
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  17. Coal

    Coal Gentleman, scholar, acrobat.

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    Wow, that doesn't sound like bollocks at all.
     
  18. Bullseye

    Bullseye Abominable Snowman

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    Some parts of it used to confuse me, my Nan used to say "H'appence three farthings for that?", farthings died out before I was born !. But that was just my Nan, she also used to say "OHH he's just like a beatnick/teddyboy". wtf was that to a young kid in the late 60's they were from the 50's. I don't know old people eh, youngsters these days don't know their born, oh the good old 70's....I remember seeing all the punk and ska bands on the pier every weekend, they had proper bands in those days.....even though we could'nt afford the price of a cup of tea.......septic tank...cold gravel.....
     
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  19. Bullseye

    Bullseye Abominable Snowman

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    I definately remember it being reported, probably had mental health issues as well ,but yeah there's always a few.
     
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  20. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    Yeah, it’s a boon that we’ve reduced the need for people to be able to do simple mental arithmetic. Who ever needed that skill, eh?

    :rolleyes:

    maximus otter
     
  21. RaM

    RaM Abominable Snowman

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    Still not got used to this new fangled decimal coinage :freak:
    just because Johnny foreigner cant count when he runs out of
    fingers we have to give up a perfectly good monetary system.
    :frust:
     
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  22. RaM

    RaM Abominable Snowman

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    Bring back the Groat all is forgiven

    :omr:
     
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  23. Dr_Baltar

    Dr_Baltar Justified & Ancient

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    And you think the introduction of decimal coinage caused that, do you? I'd like to see some evidence?
     
  24. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    Mentally calculate 10% discount off a price of £19.99p

    Now calculate 10% discount off a price of £19/19/11d

    QED.

    maximus otter
     
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  25. Dr_Baltar

    Dr_Baltar Justified & Ancient

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    You can't just write QED as though that proves anything. And how have we reduced the need for simple mental arithmetic when the decimal equivalent is simple mental arithmetic?
     
  26. Coal

    Coal Gentleman, scholar, acrobat.

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    That's more of a potential cause than evidence, but I wonder what putting together some stats on basic numeracy before and after the introduction of decimal coinage, say two years either side, would show.

    It's hard to credit someone used to working in the old system (12 pence to the shilling 20 shillings to the pound) would really have difficulty in working with the new. Once you've anchored 5p to a shilling, it's not tricky I'd have thought.
     
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  27. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."
    :confused:

    We have reduced the need for mental arithmetic to a simpler level than would previously have been required.

    maximus otter
     
  28. Dr_Baltar

    Dr_Baltar Justified & Ancient

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    And in a commercial transaction sense (as all things are with money) that is a bad thing why exactly?
     
  29. Coal

    Coal Gentleman, scholar, acrobat.

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    It's one thing to say that commercial transactions are potentially simplified, and another to say that the capacity for mental arithmetic was diminished on a wider scale by simplifying the currency.

    The former may help reduce instances of (say) petty fraud and help eliminate mistakes in purely financial transactions.

    However a greater skill in the latter, equips everyone to better understand anything that requires numbers to calculate, so for example, the price per unit weight/volume or the ability to work out if six of something at one price is better value than four of the same thing at another price.

    That supermarkets provide unit pricing information in (say) £/kg and £per/100g for two adjacent cheeses on the same shelf, certainly suggests than many people can't or don't do that math, which is in the nice simple 'base 10'.

    Likewise, I note that very often the largest multiple pack of something (say 'six-pack') is often a poorer unit price than the 'four-pack'. Would that be the case, if people actually worked out the unit price? They either don't or can't. If they don't then that's careless or dumb, if they can't, that's an awful indictment of our education system.
     
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  30. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know."


    How many sheets of plywood to make the wall? How many units of insulin per lb/kg of body weight? How many yards of wool for a kilt?

    Etc.

    maximus otter
     

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