Earliest Use Of Weapons & Tools.

Discussion in 'Earth Mysteries: Historical & Classical Cases' started by ramonmercado, Oct 21, 2009.

  1. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Archaeology team makes unprecedented tool discovery
    Mon, Aug 08, 2016

    UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA—How smart were human-like species of the Stone Age? New research published in the Journal of Archaeological Scienceby a team led by paleoanthropologist April Nowell of the University of Victoria reveals surprisingly sophisticated adaptations by early humans living 250,000 years ago in a former oasis near Azraq, Jordan.

    The research team from UVic and partner universities in the US and Jordan has found the oldest evidence of protein residue—the residual remains of butchered animals including horse, rhinoceros, wild cattle and duck—on stone tools. The discovery draws startling conclusions about how these early humans subsisted in a very demanding habitat, thousands of years before Homo sapiens first evolved in Africa.

    The team excavated 10,000 stone tools over three years from what is now a desert in the northwest of Jordan, but was once a wetland that became increasingly arid habitat 250,000 years ago. The team closely examined 7,000 of these tools, including scrapers, flakes, projectile points and hand axes (commonly known as the "Swiss army knife" of the Paleolithic period), with 44 subsequently selected as candidates for testing. Of this sample, 17 tools tested positive for protein residue, i.e. blood and other animal products. ...

    http://popular-archaeology.com/issu...ology-team-makes-unprecedented-tool-discovery
     
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  2. skinny

    skinny Justified & Ancient

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    Could go here I suppose.
    https://cosmosmagazine.com/palaeontology/accidental-tool-makers
     
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  3. kamalktk

    kamalktk Justified & Ancient

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  4. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Working for Cadburys?
     
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  5. Monstrosa

    Monstrosa Justified & Ancient

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    From the article.
    There you go
     
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  6. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    More on Sibudu.

    'Staying Longer At Home' Was Key To Stone Age Technology Change 60,000 Years Ago
    10/07/2017 06:00:00 PM

    A new study by scientists at the University of the Witwatersrand suggests that at about 58,000 years ago, Stone Age humans began to settle down, staying in one area for longer periods. The research also provides a potential answer to a long-held mystery: why older, Howiesons Poort complex technological tradition in South Africa, suddenly disappear at that time.

    Sibudu, a rock shelter near Tongaat in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, has a long and diverse archaeological sequence.

    The research paper by Dr Paloma de la Peña and Professor Lyn Wadley from the Evolutionary Studies Institute and the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, was published in PLOSONE, and is titled: Technological variability at Sibudu Cave: The end of Howiesons Poort and reduced mobility strategies after 62,000 years ago.

    De la Peña and Wadley explore the changes observed between an industry known as the Howiesons Poort (dated about 65,000 to 62,000 years ago at Sibudu) and the one that followed it at about 58,000 years ago.

    The Howiesons Poort at Sibudu contains many finely-worked, crescent-shaped stone tools fashioned from long, thin blades made on dolerite, hornfels and, to a lesser extent, quartz. These ‘segments’, as they are called, were hafted to shafts or handles at a variety of angles using compound adhesives that sometimes included red ochre (an iron oxide). ...
    Read more at https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blog...ome-was-key-to-stone.html#vg7DyWZUevgCAGfO.99
     
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