Dinosaurs (& other saurs): New Findings & Theories.

Discussion in 'New Science' started by ramonmercado, Sep 16, 2005.

  1. Swifty

    Swifty Justified and Ancient

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  2. Swifty

    Swifty Justified and Ancient

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  3. OneWingedBird

    OneWingedBird Justified and Ancient

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  4. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Were they bloodsuckers?

    Giant flying reptile ruled ancient Transylvania
    Date:
    February 10, 2017
    Source:
    University of Portsmouth
    Summary:
    A giant pterosaur – a toothless flying reptile with a 10 metre wingspan – may have been the dominant predator in ancient Romania, suggests new research. The creature has a considerably shorter and stronger neck with larger muscles than the long graceful necks of others in its species. ...

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170210131348.htm
     
  5. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    3-D reconstruction of skull suggests a small crocodile is a new species
    Unique features include openings in the jaw bone and in front of the eye, and tooth morphology

    Date:
    February 15, 2017
    Source:
    PLOS
    Summary:
    A small crocodyliform dinosaur may be a new species.
    A small crocodile discovered in Germany's Langenberg Quarry may be a new species, according to a study published February 15, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daniela Schwarz from Leibniz Institute for Evolutionary and Biodiversity Research, Germany, and colleagues.

    The Langenberg Quarry has proven to be a rich source of marine-related fossils, including small crocodile-like atoposaurid species. The fossilized remains of this crocodile were exceptionally well-preserved but were still partly in sediment, making it difficult to examine the fossils fully. After initial analysis, the crocodile was assigned to the Theriosuchus genus. To study this atopasaurid in more detail, Schwarz and colleagues did a 3-D reconstruction of one of the fossil skulls based on micro-computed tomography. ...

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170215145920.htm
     
  6. Coal

    Coal Gone full 'folk festival'

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    That is really good.
     
  7. kamalktk

    kamalktk Justified and Ancient

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  8. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    How dinosaurs learned to stand on their own two feet
    March 3, 2017 by Katie Willis in Other Sciences / Archaeology & Fossils

    Paleontologists at the University of Alberta have developed a new theory to explain why the ancient ancestors of dinosaurs stopped moving about on all fours and rose up on just their two hind legs.

    Bipedalism in dinosaurs was inherited from ancient and much smaller proto-dinosaurs. The trick to this evolution is in their tails explains Scott Persons, postdoctoral fellow and lead author on the paper.

    "The tails of proto-dinosaurs had big, leg-powering muscles," says Persons. "Having this muscle mass provided the strength and power required for early dinosaurs to stand on and move with their two back feet. We see a similar effect in many modern lizards that rise up and run bipedally."

    Over time, proto-dinosaurs evolved to run faster and for longer distances. Adaptations like hind limb elongation allowed ancient dinosaurs to run faster, while smaller forelimbs helped to reduce body weight and improve balance. Eventually, some proto-dinosaurs gave up quadrupedal walking altogether.

    The research, conducted by Persons and Phil Currie, renowned paleontologist and Canada Research Chair, also debunks theories that early proto-dinosaurs stood on two legs for the sole purpose of free their hands for use in catching prey.

    "Those explanations don't stand up," says Persons. "Many ancient bipedal dinosaurs were herbivores, and even early carnivorous dinosaurs evolved small forearms. Rather than using their hands to grapple with prey, it is more likely they seized their meals with their powerful jaws." ...

    https://phys.org/news/2017-03-dinosaurs-feet.html
     
  9. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    The first dinosaurs may have originated in the Northern Hemisphere, possibly in an area that is now Britain.

    This is one of the conclusions of the first detailed re-evaluation of the relationships between dinosaurs for 130 years.

    It shows that the current theory of how dinosaurs evolved and where they came from may well be wrong.

    This major shake-up of dinosaur theory is published in this weeks's edition of the journal Nature.

    We may be looking at the possibility that the very earliest dinosaurs were roaming an area that has become Britain and the group itself could have originated on these shores
    Matthew Baron, Cambridge University

    The reassessment shows that the meat eating beasts, such as Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptor, have been wrongly classified in the dinosaur family tree.

    One of the implications is that dinosaurs first emerged 15 million years earlier than previously believed.

    And the fossil evidence suggests that this origin may have occurred further north than current thinking suggests - possibly in an area that is now the UK, according to the new study's lead author, Matthew Baron of Cambridge University. ...

    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39305750
     
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  10. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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  11. oldrover

    oldrover Justified and Ancient

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  12. hunck

    hunck Justified and Ancient

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    World's Largest Dinosaur Footprints Found in Australia

    Nearly 5' 9" in length.


     
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  13. blessmycottonsocks

    blessmycottonsocks Great Old One

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  14. ramonmercado

    ramonmercado CyberPunk

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    Paleo Profile: Yang Zhongjian's Lizard
    Paleontologists add a new feathered dinosaur to their life list
    By Brian Switek on April 21, 2017
    We're in an age of Feathered Dinosaur Fatigue. In the 90s, when Jurassic Park canonized the image of dinosaurs as scaly in the public imagination, the discovery of any new dinosaur bearing fluff, fuzz, or feathers was a wonder. Now the list of known fluffy dinosaur species stands in the dozens, and it's easy for newly-named animals to slip under the radar. But that doesn't mean that these animals are no longer worthy of our attention. From a partial skeleton found in Cretaceous China, paleontologists Xu Xing and Qin Zi-Chuan have named one of the tiniest feathered dinosaurs yet discovered.

    The new dinosaur is named Zhongjianosaurus yangi. Weighing in at an estimated 0.6 of a pound, this dinosaur was certainly in the featherweight class. On top of that, the paleontologists write, this dinosaur's comparatively small size might be a clue to a phenomenon well-known among living animals but hard to detect among dinosaurs.

    Niche partitioning is what allows diversity to exist in whatever habitat you look at. In short, it's the concept that different species inhabit and utilize a particular space in different ways and this allows various species to coexist. In the case of China's Jehol Group, in which Zhongjianosaurus was found, as many as nine different species of dromaeosaurid dinosaur have been found. Were all these little Velociraptor relatives living alongside one another, and, if so, how did they do it? ...

    https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/laelaps/paleo-profile-yang-zhongjians-lizard/
     
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  15. Gizmos Mama

    Gizmos Mama Yeti

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  16. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    Amazing. They're finding some really good stuff these days.
     
  17. Xanatic*

    Xanatic* Justified and Ancient

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    I'm a bit worried. Isn't that how the movie Reign of Fire began?
     
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