Ancient Instruments & Music

Discussion in 'Fortean Culture' started by skinny, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. skinny

    skinny Antediluvian

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    Here's an extended version of Rainbow Voice from the same film, featuring a male virtuoso this time.
    WARNING: If you are listening through headphones, take care - the harmonics are quite piercing at times.


    Another awesome piece featured in the Baraka soundtrack. This one (by the original artist?) without Stearns' added atmospherics. I love the taiko drum beat at the end of Stearns' version, but this is more plaintive.

    Is it a sitar?

    Nope - violin. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Subramaniam
     
  2. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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    There was a discussion re overtone or throat singing on another thread. Can't remember which one now but oldrover & me were attempting it. There's 'how to' vids on youtube. I've found I can get overtones emerging & although they're not very loud they're definitely there.

    The best ones imo are the mongolian ones. Some of the whistling flute-like overtones they get are quite amazing.
     
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  3. EnolaGaia

    EnolaGaia I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ... Staff Member

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  4. James_H

    James_H And I like to roam the land

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  5. skinny

    skinny Antediluvian

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    I love the mbira. Exotic, transfixing and relaxing.

    From the wiki:
    Various kinds of plucked idiophones and lamellaphones have existed in Africa for thousands of years. The tines were originally made of bamboo but over the years metal keys have been developed. The mbira appears to have been invented twice in Africa: a wood or bamboo-tined instrument appeared on the west coast of Africa about 3,000 years ago, and metal-tined lamellophones appeared in the Zambezi River valley around 1,300 years ago

    [​IMG]

    Stella Chiweshe sings.



    Several mbira songs introduced to explain their meaning. 41 minutes of pure pleasure.
     
  6. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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    The Kora

    From West Africa - a cross between harp/lute, with 21 strings. Evidence that it could date from the 14th century.

    [​IMG]

    One of the top current players Madou Sidiki Diabate from Mali. He's the 71st generation of Kora players in his family.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  7. Mythopoeika

    Mythopoeika I am a meat popsicle

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    Odd instrument, but a beautiful sound.
     
  8. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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    Yeah, weird looking things but quite angelic sounding. Some players can get into quite mesmeric trance-like syncopated grooves.

    I saw a couple of kora players years ago which turned me on to it. Dembo Konte was one of them. They played most of the gig sitting on the floor but on the last number they rose & played standing up with the bulbous resonator in their crotch & the pole sticking out - very phallic. They had big smiles on their faces.
     
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  9. JamesWhitehead

    JamesWhitehead Piffle Prospector

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    71 generations is a lot of time! It's probably a convention in griot oral history for a lot of time. :cool:
     
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  10. maximus otter

    maximus otter Recovering policeman

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    You don't have the "Need to Know"
    From memory, this was one of the few remnants of oral history preserved in the family of Alex Haley, the author of Roots: a fiddle was referred to among the family as a “ko”.

    maximus otter
     
  11. hunck

    hunck Justified & Ancient

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    This is a great film of a day in the life of now deceased kora man & griot Alhaji Bai Konte, shot on location in Brikama, Gambia, narrated by Taj Mahal. Not sure of the year but looks maybe 70s. The afore mentioned Dembo was his son, and also features in the film as well as other family members. I think he's dead too.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  12. XEPER_

    XEPER_ Abominable Snowman

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    Not sure if it's the same thing but I managed to do something similar when I was singing in the car one day. It sounded like I was able to make two separate voices. My daughter was in the car with me and we were both amazed when it came out, so I tried and was able to do it again.
    It was about three years ago now and I forgot all about it.
    Today I was trying to sing along to Maiden's "Aces High" and nearly blew up my head trying to hit the final scream.
     

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